News | Radiology Business | May 31, 2016

Two More States Enact Licensure Laws for Radiologic Technologists

Tennessee and New Hampshire join list of states with licensure standards; five states and Washington, D.C. still without standards

ASRT, Tennessee, New Hampshire, radiologic technologists, licensure standards

May 31, 2016 — The governors of Tennessee and New Hampshire have signed into law measures that establish licensure standards for radiologic technologists in their states. 

In Tennessee, the General Assembly adopted Senate Bill 899, a measure that expands licensure conditions to include additional types of healthcare settings where medical imaging and radiation therapy professionals practice. Previously in Tennessee, only personnel performing radiographic procedures in physicians' offices were required to hold a license.

In New Hampshire, the General Court enacted Senate Bill 330, a law that establishes licensure requirements for radiographers, radiation therapists, nuclear medicine technologists, magnetic resonance technologists, radiologist assistants, limited X-ray machine operators and sonographers.

In both states the legislation also authorizes the establishment of administrative boards to organize and manage the new licensure and certification requirements.

The American Society of Radiologic Technologists guided the legislative efforts and teamed up with radiologic technologists and state affiliate societies during the lengthy legislative processes.

Five states and the District of Columbia still have no licensure or regulatory requirements for medical imaging and radiation therapy personnel.

For more information: www.asrt.org

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