News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | March 09, 2016

Trinity Mother Frances Selects Toshiba Aplio 500 Platinum Cardiovascular Ultrasound

System helps East Texas’ premier integrated delivery network improve workflow, PACS/EMR integration with advanced visualization

Toshiba, Aplio 500 Platinum cardiovascular ultrasound, Trinity Mother Frances, East Texas

March 9, 2016 —The Louis and Peaches Owen Heart Hospital at Trinity Mother Frances Hospitals and Clinics is providing its vascular surgery patients with fast, high-quality ultrasound exams using two new Aplio 500 Platinum systems from Toshiba America Medical Systems Inc. The premier integrated delivery network (IDN) in East Texas is utilizing the systems in its vascular surgical group for pre-surgical planning.

“During our competitive review process, the overwhelming consensus by our physicians and technologists was that the Aplio 500 provided the best features, options and benefits,” said Joel Kempf, MBA, RT(R), director of operations, imaging, Trinity Mother Frances. “The systems have significantly improved our workflow and allowed us to add capacity and provide better access to our patients. Combining the system with our electronic medical records and PACS [picture archiving and communication systems] facilitates fast and accurate reporting, allowing our physicians to quickly and accurately assess patient care planning.”

Toshiba’s Aplio 500 Platinum ultrasound system provides powerful clinical imaging tools for advanced visualization, quantification and intervention. The technology delivers deep penetration, which is particularly helpful for imaging bariatric patients. Exams are also easy to perform with the iStyle+ Productivity Suite, which provides a full range of workflow automation tools that bring ergonomic relief by minimizing keystrokes, reducing exam times and increasing the consistency of exams.

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

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