News | Radiology Business | July 11, 2017

Toshiba Medical and AHRA Open Applications for 10th Annual Putting Patients First Program

Grants support providers in pursuit of improved patient care and safety in diagnostic imaging

Toshiba Medical and AHRA Open Applications for 10th Annual Putting Patients First Program

July 11, 2017 — AHRA (the Association for Medical Imaging Management) and Toshiba Medical announced the tenth year of their Putting Patients First program. Putting Patients First grants enable healthcare facilities to fund programs, training or seminars aimed at improving patient care and safety and customizing treatment in computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, X-ray and vascular imaging. The grants are funded by an unrestricted educational grant from Toshiba Medical.

The AHRA & Toshiba Putting Patients First program provides six grants of up to $7,500 each to hospitals and imaging centers, and an additional grant of up to $20,000 to an integrated delivery network (IDN). Three of the $7,500 grants are awarded for projects that improve pediatric imaging, while the other three are awarded for projects that improve overall patient care and safety in imaging. The grant of up to $20,000 is awarded to an IDN or hospital system for projects that improve overall patient care and safety in imaging across the IDN/hospital system. All winning facilities will then develop and share their best practices.

“In the program’s ten years of operation, Putting Patients First has awarded 57 grants totaling $555,000 to facilities that are innovating and striving for constant improvements to the patient experience in diagnostic imaging,” said Jason Newmark, CRA, FAHRA, president, AHRA. “Diagnostic imaging is powerful and versatile in its abilities to accurately diagnose and treat patients, and we are proud to partner with healthcare facilities that prioritize efforts to make imaging safer, offer continuing physician education and enhance the overall patient experience.”

Putting Patients First applicants are judged on their program plan and ability to share best practices. The applicants’ programs should address one or more of the following:

  • Reducing radiation and/or contrast dose;
  • Reducing the need for sedation;
  • Improving communication with patients regarding the process;
  • Improving patient comfort; and
  • Improving the overall clinical pathway.

All eligible facilities are encouraged to apply by completing an application at www.ahra.org/PatientsFirstProgram. The deadline to apply is Oct. 30, 2017, and the winners, selected by AHRA, will be announced at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting in December.

For more information: www.ahra.org

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