News | Ultrasound Imaging | June 13, 2017

Toshiba Medical’s Premium Ultrasound Platform Enables Fast and Safe Liver Imaging

UC San Diego Health uses the Aplio i-series’ contrast-enhanced ultrasound package

 

ultrasound platform

Physicians now have the powerful imaging technology they need for fast, safe and reliable evaluation of liver lesions with the premium AplioTM i-series ultrasound platform from Toshiba Medical, a Canon Group company. With the recent expansion of LI-RADS (Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System) to include contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) characterization, the Aplio i-series offers an ideal solution for confident diagnoses.

Offering healthcare providers a more cost-effective, less invasive and safer solution than other radiation emitting modalities, the Aplio i-series is a highly advanced and scalable ultrasound solution made up of the Aplio i700 and Aplio i800. Health systems, such as UC San Diego Health, are using the Aplio i-series’ imaging resolution and penetration, and comprehensive CEUS imaging and quantification package, to assess perfusion dynamics in the liver and help improve HCC surveillance results.

“The Aplio i-series offers the superb image quality clinicians need to make confident diagnosis and provide excellent patient care,” said Dan Skyba, director, Ultrasound Business Unit, Toshiba America Medical Systems, Inc. “Combining a brand new system architecture with matrix transducer technology and a world-renown CEUS imaging package, these premium systems offer best in class resolution, penetration and dynamic contrast visualization. The Aplio i-series facilitates small HCC diagnosis and surveillance, even in obese or difficult to image patients, while improving workflow and keeping patients safe and more comfortable. As the transition to a value-based healthcare system continues, the use of CEUS for characterization of focal liver lesions is an example of a cost-effective and high-value clinical solution.”

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

 

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