News | March 23, 2012

Toshiba’s Newest Ultrasound Offers Breakthrough Technology, Advanced Cardiac Capabilities

Stock image

March 23, 2012 — Improving the ability to diagnose cardiac disease with advanced ultrasound imaging, Toshiba America Medical Systems Inc. will showcase the newest additions to its ultrasound product line, Aplio 500 and Aplio 300, at the American College of Cardiology’s annual meeting March 24-27, 2012 in Chicago. Toshiba will also be introducing new enhancements to its Aplio Artida flagship cardiac ultrasound.

Toshiba’s Aplio 500 brings quantitative cardiac analysis bedside and is the system of choice for all 2-D cardiac imaging needs. Aplio 500 features Toshiba’s Wall Motion Tracking technology, combined with superior ergonomics and a smaller footprint, making it easier to maneuver for greater patient access and improved workflow. Toshiba’s new high-end shared-service ultrasound system, Aplio 300, offers image quality in a versatile platform designed for routine ultrasound exams, including cardiac.

The Aplio 500 also offers a unique 3-D vessels fly-through feature, similar to virtual colonoscopy fly-through imaging. Toshiba said due to the time required for the volume acquisition, the feature does not work on fast moving vessels such as coronaries. However, it does have application with peripheral vessels. To see an example of this fly-through technology, click here.

Aplio Artida’s new software version 3.0 offers improved 3-D imaging and next-generation 3-D Wall Motion Tracking software, which provide accurate and reproducible quantitative analysis of cardiac function. In addition, the Artida’s enhanced single-beat 3-D acquisition allows physicians to obtain high-quality 3-D images with detailed 3-D Wall Motion Tracking analysis on a wider range of patients, including those with arrhythmias and shortness of breath.

“Aplio Artida’s 3-D Wall Motion Tracking capability enables clinicians to assess live 3-D volume images in one cardiac cycle, allowing physicians to get their clinical information faster, even on technically difficult patients,” said Tomohiro Hasegawa, director of the ultrasound business unit at Toshiba. “Combining the dedicated cardiac system, Aplio Artida, with the new Aplio 500 and 300 gives Toshiba a complete cardiac ultrasound portfolio for virtually any imaging need.”

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

Related Content

Philips Lumify Earns U.S. Army Airworthiness Certification
News | Ultrasound Imaging | May 22, 2019
Philips announced that Philips Lumify, a point-of-care ultrasound device, has earned the U.S. Army Airworthiness...
Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carrie Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res
Videos | Advanced Visualization | May 16, 2019
This is an example of how virtual reality is being used in neuro-radiology to better evaluate patients using advanced
Clarius Releases Clarius Live Ultrasound Telemedicine Solution
Technology | Ultrasound Imaging | May 15, 2019
Clarius Mobile Health released a telemedicine solution called Clarius Live. The simple-to-use feature allows any...
Ultrasonic Device Safe and Effective for Lung Vessel Sealing in Minimally Invasive Lobectomy
News | Interventional Radiology | May 06, 2019
According to a new study, an ultrasonic vessel-sealing device can improve patient outcomes by reducing the incidence of...
Hong Kong Polytechnic University Develops Palm-sized 3-D Scoliosis Ultrasound Imaging System
News | Ultrasound Imaging | May 03, 2019
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) announced the development of a palm-sized 3-D ultrasound imaging system...
Bioprinting research from the lab of Rice University bioengineer Jordan Miller featured a proof-of-principle — a scale-model of a lung-mimicking air sac with airways and blood vessels that never touch yet still provide oxygen to red blood cells.

Bioprinting research from the lab of Rice University bioengineer Jordan Miller featured a proof-of-principle — a scale-model of a lung-mimicking air sac with airways and blood vessels that never touch yet still provide oxygen to red blood cells. Image courtesy of Jordan Miller/Rice University.

News | Medical 3-D Printing | May 03, 2019
Bioengineers have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3-D printing replacement organs with a breakthrough technique...
New Guideline Published for Evaluation of Valvular Regurgitation After Catheter-based Valve Interventions
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | April 30, 2019
A new document compiled by four cardiac imaging professional societies provides a resource to guide clinicians in best...
California Hospital Adds Machine-Vision Image Guided Surgery Platform to New Operating Suites
News | Advanced Visualization | April 26, 2019
Pickup Family Neurosciences Institute at Hoag in Newport Beach, Calif., announced the addition of the 7D Surgical...