News | March 23, 2012

Toshiba’s Newest Ultrasound Offers Breakthrough Technology, Advanced Cardiac Capabilities

March 23, 2012 — Improving the ability to diagnose cardiac disease with advanced ultrasound imaging, Toshiba America Medical Systems Inc. will showcase the newest additions to its ultrasound product line, Aplio 500 and Aplio 300, at the American College of Cardiology’s annual meeting March 24-27, 2012 in Chicago. Toshiba will also be introducing new enhancements to its Aplio Artida flagship cardiac ultrasound.

Toshiba’s Aplio 500 brings quantitative cardiac analysis bedside and is the system of choice for all 2-D cardiac imaging needs. Aplio 500 features Toshiba’s Wall Motion Tracking technology, combined with superior ergonomics and a smaller footprint, making it easier to maneuver for greater patient access and improved workflow. Toshiba’s new high-end shared-service ultrasound system, Aplio 300, offers image quality in a versatile platform designed for routine ultrasound exams, including cardiac.

The Aplio 500 also offers a unique 3-D vessels fly-through feature, similar to virtual colonoscopy fly-through imaging. Toshiba said due to the time required for the volume acquisition, the feature does not work on fast moving vessels such as coronaries. However, it does have application with peripheral vessels. To see an example of this fly-through technology, click here.

Aplio Artida’s new software version 3.0 offers improved 3-D imaging and next-generation 3-D Wall Motion Tracking software, which provide accurate and reproducible quantitative analysis of cardiac function. In addition, the Artida’s enhanced single-beat 3-D acquisition allows physicians to obtain high-quality 3-D images with detailed 3-D Wall Motion Tracking analysis on a wider range of patients, including those with arrhythmias and shortness of breath.

“Aplio Artida’s 3-D Wall Motion Tracking capability enables clinicians to assess live 3-D volume images in one cardiac cycle, allowing physicians to get their clinical information faster, even on technically difficult patients,” said Tomohiro Hasegawa, director of the ultrasound business unit at Toshiba. “Combining the dedicated cardiac system, Aplio Artida, with the new Aplio 500 and 300 gives Toshiba a complete cardiac ultrasound portfolio for virtually any imaging need.”

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

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