News | Digital Radiography (DR) | November 18, 2020

Tidelands Health Enhances Patient Care with New Mobile X-ray Systems

Tidelands Health, a growing healthcare provider in South Carolina, uses Carestream Health’s DRX-Revolution Mobile X-ray Systems to deliver improved patient care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

November 17, 2020 — Tidelands Health, a growing healthcare provider in South Carolina, uses Carestream Health’s DRX-Revolution Mobile X-ray Systems to deliver improved patient care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Mobile units have helped the healthcare system to keep Patients Under Investigation (PUI) and COVID-19-positive patients isolated by attending to their X-ray needs at the bedside.

“It’s been a rough year and being able to take these mobile X-ray units directly to a patient’s bedside has been critical,” said Kimberly Cook, Director of Inpatient Imaging at Tidelands Health.

Tidelands Health uses five DRX-Revolution units across two hospitals. “When the pandemic started, our policy was that every X-ray exam for a PUI or a COVID-positive patient was done at bedside,” said Kathleen Stier, Imaging Supervisor at Tidelands Health.

Carestream’s DRX-Revolution Mobile X-ray System has additional features that help reduce contamination, including flush-mounted displays that provide a smooth surface for better disinfecting and wristband barcode scanners for easier workflow and limited equipment interaction.

Mobile systems at Tidelands Health also are used in intensive care, labor and delivery and post-operative care units, conducting exams such as chest X-rays, line placements and extremity imaging. “The mobility of these units allows us to go into rooms that aren’t really set up for mobile X-ray exams, yet they move around the room with ease,” Stier said.

Designed to quietly navigate hallways and operate in tight spaces, the DRX-Revolution uses a wireless detector.

“Because our staff cares for COVID-positive patients, they wear a lot of protective clothing. These lighter detectors along with the ease of mobility make it a lot easier on our staff,” Cook said.

The user-friendly interface has enabled quicker training and technologists can troubleshoot issues themselves, if needed. An easily maneuverable system with a collapsible column has been beneficial. “You don’t have to twist around to see where you’re going,” Stier added.

The DRX-Revolution has a lighter, balanced tube head and collimator with responsive display screens located at both the tube head and main display. Technologists now have another point of visibility with new functional LED lighting, a feature that has been a boon at Tidelands Health. “You don’t have to walk around the unit to see your image, and you can stand on the other side of the patient and still see it,” Stier said.

Tidelands Health has observed the advancements and new features in mobile imaging systems over the years. “One of the great features is that these mobile units don’t diminish the quality of the imaging, even at bedside,” she said. “Especially with this unit, it doesn’t compromise quality at all.”

For more information: tidelandshealth.org

Related Content

Axial FLAIR MR image shows T2 prolongation in bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles (arrows). Findings were associated with restricted diffusion and areas of T1 hypointense signal without enhancement or abnormal susceptibility. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Axial FLAIR MR image shows T2 prolongation in bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles (arrows). Findings were associated with restricted diffusion and areas of T1 hypointense signal without enhancement or abnormal susceptibility. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — According to an...
Examples of the imaging performance of XPCI-CT (b,e) compared to conventional specimen radiography (a,d) and benchmarked against histopathology (c,f). he top row focuses on the similarity between the XPCI-CT slice in (b) and the histological slice in (c). Arrow 1 indicates margin involvement, arrow 2 a variation in density in the internal structure of the tumour mass, arrow 3 tumour-induced inflammation. All this is confirmed by the histological slice in (c), and hardly visible in the conventional image in

Examples of the imaging performance of XPCI-CT (b,e) compared to conventional specimen radiography (a,d) and benchmarked against histopathology (c,f). he top row focuses on the similarity between the XPCI-CT slice in (b) and the histological slice in (c). Arrow 1 indicates margin involvement, arrow 2 a variation in density in the internal structure of the tumour mass, arrow 3 tumour-induced inflammation. All this is confirmed by the histological slice in (c), and hardly visible in the conventional image in (a). The bottom row focuses on the detection of small calcifications, a key feature in DCIS. These are undetectable in (d), detected in (e), enhanced in the maximum intensity projection (MIP) image at the bottom of (f), and confirmed by histopathology in the top part of (f). The scale bar [shown in (b) and (e)] is the same for all images apart from (f), which has its own scale. Red arrows in (e) and (f) indicate the microcalcifications. Image courtesy of Professor Alessandro Olivo

News | Breast Imaging | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — A new X-ray imaging scanne
Dr Sahar Saleem placing the mummy in the CT scanner

Dr. Sahar Saleem placing the mummy in the CT scanner. Image courtesy of Sahar Saleem

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — Modern medical technology is helping scholars tell a more nuanced story about the fate of an anci
 Enterprise imaging systems provider Intelerad Medical Systems announced it has acquired Lumedx, a leading provider of healthcare analytics and cardiovascular information systems (CVIS). 
News | Enterprise Imaging | February 18, 2021
February 18, 2021 – Enterprise imaging systems provider Intelerad Medical Systems announced it has acquired...
GE Healthcare introduced its artificial intelligence (AI) automation features on its Voluson Swift ultrasound platform at the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) virtual meeting. Features of this system include semi-automated contouring, auto identification of fetal anatomy and positioning on imaging. AI is seeing increasing integration in ultrasound systems from numerous vendors.

GE Healthcare introduced its artificial intelligence (AI) automation features on its Voluson Swift ultrasound platform at the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) virtual meeting. Features of this system include semi-automated contouring, auto identification of fetal anatomy and positioning on imaging. AI is seeing increasing integration in ultrasound systems from numerous vendors.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | February 18, 2021 | By Dave Fornell, Editor
Recent advances in ultrasound image sy...
Example MR images from paediatric brain tumour patients. This first column shows T1-weighted images following the injection of gadolinium contrast agent. The second column shows T2-weighted images and the final column shows apparent diffusion coefficient maps calculated from diffusion-weighted images. (a–c) are taken from a patient with a Pilocytic Astrocytoma, (d–f) are from a patient with an Ependymoma and (g–i) were acquired from a patient with a Medulloblastoma.

Example MR images from paediatric brain tumour patients. This first column shows T1-weighted images following the injection of gadolinium contrast agent. The second column shows T2-weighted images and the final column shows apparent diffusion coefficient maps calculated from diffusion-weighted images. (ac) are taken from a patient with a Pilocytic Astrocytoma, (df) are from a patient with an Ependymoma and (gi) were acquired from a patient with a Medulloblastoma. Image courtesy of Nature Research Journal

News | Pediatric Imaging | February 17, 2021
February 17, 2021 — Diffusio...
T1 structural images for the two sequences, MPRAGE and MPRAGE+PMC. The top row shows the MPRAGE sequence, while the bottom row shows the images that were generated with the MPRAGE+PMC sequence. Columns represent two different participants, one with minimal head motion (left, Low-Mover) and another with a large quantity of motion (right, High-Mover). Pial and white matter (WM) surface reconstruction from Freesurfer are also shown.

T1 structural images for the two sequences, MPRAGE and MPRAGE+PMC. The top row shows the MPRAGE sequence, while the bottom row shows the images that were generated with the MPRAGE+PMC sequence. Columns represent two different participants, one with minimal head motion (left, Low-Mover) and another with a large quantity of motion (right, High-Mover). Pial and white matter (WM) surface reconstruction from Freesurfer are also shown.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 17, 2021
February 17, 2021 — A new paper,...
Radiology, radiation therapy, PACS, Enterprise image, X-ray, DR Systems, CT, MRI, contrast, ultrasound, VNA, product comparisons, comparison charts on ITN magazine.
Feature | February 17, 2021
Imaging Technology News (ITN) maintains more than 40
Insightec plans to expand in Latin America through a partnership with Strattner
News | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | February 16, 2021
February 16, 2021 — Insightec, a global healthcare company focused on creating the next generation of patient care, a