News | Advanced Visualization | July 03, 2019

TeraRecon Unveils iNtuition AI Data Extractor

New tool enables customer base to automatically convert 3-D post-processed studies into rich AI training datasets

TeraRecon Unveils iNtuition AI Data Extractor

July 3, 2019 — Artificial Intelligence (AI) and advanced visualization company TeraRecon announced its new iNtuition AI Data Extractor. The new technology empowers its clients to automatically transform clinicians’ archived and day-forward advanced visualization data into valuable AI research-ready training datasets.

With the addition of the iNtuition AI Data Extractor, users can quickly convert iNtuition post-processed data — completed in the normal course of routine clinical reading workflow — into volumetric, high-fidelity labeled datasets. This data can be further optimized by leveraging iNtuition as a clinical-quality data labeler and used by data scientists to create and train algorithms. 

The Extractor will be offered to customers free for the first 90 studies, with a low per-image extraction fee thereafter. TeraRecon customers can now derive new value from many years of past physician, technologist and system-based advanced 3-D post-processing by leveraging the iNtuition AI Data Extractor and converting exported files into the necessary formats for continuous algorithm development and training.

TeraRecon is used within many of the highest volume 3-D post-processing labs, some of which process approximately 200,000 studies per year, according to the company. “At 3DR, we have 100 full-time 3-D technologists who are highly skilled at segmentation and anatomic labeling. They have a deep understanding of our clients’ diagnostic interpretation requirements and produce 3-D post-processed imaging data sets used by many of the most prestigious health systems in America,” said Robert Falk, M.D., chief medical officer at 3DR Laboratories in Louisville, Ky. “Our most sophisticated work is performed on TeraRecon’s iNtuition solution. We are proud to be able to offer this profoundly simple way for our customers to access the AI Extractor technology and immediately unlock the value of their data.”

Shannon Walters, executive manager of a prominent 3-D and quantitative imaging lab, said, “The most important thing that AI can do for my department is help people do their work better day-by-day. I am excited that the clinical expertise of my staff can now be utilized in the development of new AI tools.”

The iNtuition AI Data Extractor is made available as an engine that runs locally or in the cloud as part of the EnvoyAI platform. This new offering is the first in a series of developer-focused EnvoyAI engines that will streamline the training, delivery and application of new AI algorithms.

EnvoyAI is a medical imaging AI marketplace and interoperability platform, currently offering over 80 algorithms with 20 holding regulatory clearances in various global territories. All EnvoyAI marketplace algorithms, including the iNtuition AI Data Extractor, are offered with a free trial period allowing clinicians to experiment with the ever-growing number of commercial-ready and research-use AI products.

TeraRecon technologies — including the EnvoyAI platform, TeraRecon Northstar AI Results Explorer, and its flagship iNtuition advanced visualization solution — were on display at the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting, June 26-28 in Aurora, Colo.

For more information: www.terarecon.com

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