News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 20, 2020

Synaptive Medical Secures Health Canada Approval for Evry

First-of-its-kind technology to provide broader access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

Synaptive Medical, a leader in robotic surgical visualization, announced today the company has secured approval from Health Canada for Evry, the company’s superconducting, head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system

February 20, 2020 — Synaptive Medical, a leader in robotic surgical visualization, announced today the company has secured approval from Health Canada for Evry, the company’s superconducting, head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Evry has been designed to provide imaging directly at the point of care in areas outside of diagnostic imaging departments, which was previously unachievable due to the size of conventional MRIs.

To overcome the challenges associated with MRI innovation, including accessibility in critical and acute cases like brain tumor and ischemic stroke, Synaptive developed Evry as a means for healthcare professionals to make accurate cranial diagnoses in time-sensitive cases. Among Evry’s features include a mid-field 0.5T superconducting magnet that reduces the system’s physical footprint, as well as predefined imaging protocols, automated series planning including volume selection, a detachable stretcher to support bedside transfers and a multichannel head coil with patient-specific customized fitting intended to optimize image quality. Evry also bypasses the need for rigging and cranes for the delivery of MRI, yearly cryogen refills, a cryogen pipe and reinforced flooring, thus providing significant cost advantages.

“Securing Health Canada approval for Evry not only marks a significant milestone for Synaptive, but for healthcare professionals in Canada who now have the ability to more broadly provide point-of-care diagnostics for patients in a variety of urgent settings,” said Cameron Piron, interim chief executive officer, president and co-founder of Synaptive Medical. “As with our entire suite of surgical and diagnostic products, our goal is to provide surgeons and healthcare systems with state-of-the art tools that maximize their ability to provide optimal care for patients.”

Taufik Valiante, M.D., Ph.D., FRCSC associate professor of neurosurgery at the University of Toronto, Ontario, stated, “In acute care settings where every second counts, having the ability to clearly visualize and diagnose patients is critical for maximizing patients’ chances of success. With the availability of Evry in Canada, healthcare professionals now have an added tool that will allow for more informed decision making in situations where MRI technology may not have otherwise been feasible.” 

All of Synaptive’s products uniquely provide critical information to improve neurological care and patient outcomes; and when combined, the products empower healthcare professionals to fully optimize the quality and delivery of their services.

Synaptive will initially sell Evry to health systems in Canada and is pursuing regulatory clearance in markets outside the country.

For more information: www.synaptivemedical.com

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