News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 02, 2016

Substantial Growth Found in Ordering of CTA Exams in Medicare Population

New study published in JVIR finds biggest increase in ED setting; radiologists continue to be dominant providers

CT angiography, CTA, Medicare population, Harvey L. Neiman, CMS

August 2, 2016 — According to a new study , the last 13 years have seen substantial growth in the ordering of computed tomography angiography (CTA) examinations in the Medicare population, particularly in the emergency department (ED) setting. While radiologists generally do not order imaging exams, the study, conducted by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute and published online in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (JVIR), found that radiologists remain the dominant providers of CTA exams, with the chest being the most common body region imaged with CTA.

“Using aggregated Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) claims data from 2001 through 2014, we identified growth in overall volumes in CTA services and per beneficiary utilization of CTA exams,” said Neiman Institute affiliate research fellow and lead study author Anand M. Prabhakar, M.D., MBA. “Although this trend was present for all types of CTA services and in all major sites of service, we found that growth was greatest for chest CTA and for CTA services in the ED.”

Prabhakar, a Harvard radiologist, and his colleagues found that between 2001 and 2014, total CTA services in the Medicare FFS population grew from 64,846 to 1,709,088. They also found that the total number of CTA exams per 1,000 Medicare enrollees continuously increased from 2.1 in 2001 to 4.6 in 2013. Chest CTA utilization per 1,000 Medicare enrollees increased the most, rising year over year from 1.2 in 2001 to 25.4 in 2013. CTA services grew most rapidly in the ED setting, with the percentage of studies performed annually in EDs increasing from 11 percent in 2001 to 28 percent in 2014. By far, the largest growth in CTA services involved the chest, increasing from 36,984 in 2001 to 914,086 in 2014.

“CTA growth in EDs continues to outpace all other sites of service. With further advances in CT technology such as dual source imaging, we anticipate this trend to continue as CTA exams continue to provide information previously only available through catheter-directed angiography,” noted Prabhakar.

“These findings underscore the importance of ongoing high quality vascular imaging training for both diagnostic and interventional radiologists,” noted Richard Duszak, M.D., FACR, professor and vice chair for health policy and practice in the department of radiology and imaging sciences at Emory University and senior research fellow at the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute. “As new interventional radiology residency programs are now being implemented, it will be important for programs to ensure that their trainees achieve high levels of proficiency in their vascular cross sectional imaging skills to meet this growing need.”

 

Watch the video “CT for Chest Pain Evaluation in The Emergency Department — SCCT 2015.”

 

Read the article, “ACC, ACR Release Guidelines for Emergency Department Chest Pain Diagnosis.”

 

For more information: www.jvir.org

Related Content

Example of an intentionally truncated CT image

Figure 1: Example of an intentionally truncated CT image. The truncation percentage was calculated as the ratio of the patient border touching the field of view to the total patient border (red/(read+blue)). Image courtesy of Qaelum.

Feature | Radiation Dose Management | July 15, 2019 | Niki Fitousi, Ph.D., and An Dedulle
One of the main benefits of a radiation dose management system is the possibility to automatically generate alerts when...
FDA Approves Bayer's Gadavist Contrast for Cardiac MRI in Adult Coronary Artery Disease Patients
Technology | Contrast Media | July 15, 2019
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Gadavist injection for use in cardiac magnetic resonance...
Routine scan of abdomen pelvis taken with the UW-Madison’s Revolution 256 CT scanner using the FDA-cleared reconstruction algorithm, called TrueFidelity.

Routine scan of abdomen pelvis taken with the UW-Madison’s Revolution 256 CT scanner using the FDA-cleared reconstruction algorithm, called TrueFidelity. UW-Madison was the first site in the U.S. to get this technology. Its use is now being integrated into UW CT protocols. Image courtesy of Timothy P. Szczykutowicz

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 12, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
When providers develop their own imaging protocols, they are wasting time and money, according to...
Mednax National Cardiac Centers of Excellence Program Highlighted at SCCT 2019
News | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 11, 2019
Mednax Inc. and Mednax Radiology Solutions announced that Chief Medical Officer Ricardo C. Cury, M.D., FSCCT, will...
360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 11, 2019
This 360 degree photo shows a basic, point-of-care cardiac echocardiogram being performed using a smartphone turned i
Achenbach to Receive Inaugural 2019 Stephan Achenbach Pioneer Award in Cardiovascular CT
News | Cardiac Imaging | July 10, 2019
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) will present Stephan Achenbach, M.D., FSCCT with the inaugural...
Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence to Deliver Personalized Radiation Therapy
News | Radiation Therapy | July 09, 2019
New Cleveland Clinic-led research shows that artificial intelligence (AI) can use medical scans and health records to...
360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 09, 2019
A view of a mitral valve on a GE Healthcare Vivid E95 ...
Jonathon Leipsic Awarded 2019 DeHaan Award for Innovation in Cardiology
News | Cardiac Imaging | July 08, 2019
Jonathon A. Leipsic, M.D., FSCCT, is the recipient of the 2019 DeHaan Award for Innovation in Cardiology, announced by...
360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 08, 2019
This is a 360 degree view of a live cardiac echo demonstration for the Siemens Healthineers Acuson SC2000...