News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | December 07, 2020

Study Shows Decline in Medical Visits Due to COVID-19 Fear

16% of people believe they have developed a medical condition since the coronavirus crisis started but have not seen a doctor because they worry about getting COVID-19

16% of people believe they have developed a medical condition since the coronavirus crisis started but have not seen a doctor because they worry about getting COVID-19

December 7, 2020 — New research* from Zegami, an Oxford based medical image analysis platform, reveals that 29% of people say they have a known and diagnosed medical condition but since the Coronavirus crisis started they have avoided seeing a doctor or visiting hospital because they are worried about contracting COVID-19. In terms of gender, one in three women (34%) and one in four men (24%) admit to this.

Zegami, which has recently developed a system to analyze large numbers of mammograms and identify abnormalities, which is the first stage of breast cancer screening, says its research reveals that as many as 254,000 people with cancer may have avoided seeing their doctor or visiting hospital because of fears around COVID-19.

Zegami’s research also found that 16% of people believe they have developed a medical condition since the coronavirus crisis started but decided not to see a doctor, again because of fears about COVID-19.  Some 101,000 people believe their condition could be cancer.   

In terms of those people who have known diagnosed medical conditions and have avoided seeking medical help during the crisis, 21%  said it was for mental health issues, followed by 14% who said they have skin conditions and 9% who have eye health issues.  Some 7% said it was related to their heart conditions, and 2% to cancer.

Of those people who believe they have developed medical conditions during the crisis but have not sought a medical diagnosis for fear of catching COVID-19,  22% say it is linked to their mental health, followed by 13% who say it is a skin condition. Some 7% fear they have developed a heart condition during the crisis, and 1% - nearly 101,000 people - think they may have cancer.         

Roger Noble, CEO and founder of Zegami said: “Our findings are very alarming. The NHS is currently running a high profile campaign urging people to get medical help if they think they have developed any medical conditions during the crisis, and to keep to any health appointments they have for existing conditions. Its Help Us Help You access campaign is backed by celebrities including TV chefs Gordon Ramsay, Nadiya Hussein, and actress Emma Thompson, and we fully support this.”

Zegami’s newly developed system for analyzing large numbers of mammograms and identifying abnormalities uses the recently announced Medical Imaging Server for DICOM from Microsoft.  The system also allows scientists to develop machine learning models to automate this analysis, making it faster and more accurate.

Initial mammogram data for the system has been sourced from The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA)  and consists of 3,486 DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) images, which while anonymized, includes pathology data, allowing this to be factored into the analysis.  One example of the analysis is a map of the "calcification" breast cancer abnormalities - the system highlights regions distinctly containing examples with little light areas, which are typically the benign (without a callback) instances.

*Zegami commissioned the market research company Consumer Intelligence to survey 1,021 people from across the UK.  They represented the UK’s demographic profile.  Interviews were conducted online between 13 and 16 November 2020.    

For more information: www.zegami.com

Related Content

MRI of Nonferromagnetic Ballistics Suspended in Gelatin. 

MRI of Nonferromagnetic Ballistics Suspended in Gelatin. Scout (A), T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) (B), T2-weighted SE (C), T2-weighted gradient-recalled echo (GRE) (TR/TE, 500/10; D), and T2-weighted GRE (TR/TE, 700/30; E) MR images show jacket hollow point .45 automatic Colt pistol bullet (Corbon) (1), solid lead .45 Long Colt bullet (Winchester) (2), full metal jacket (FMJ) automatic Colt pistol bullet (Winchester) (3), 5.56-mm FMJ bullet (Federal Ammunition) (4), #7 lead shotgun pellet (Winchester) (5), and 5-mm lead air gun pellet (Sheridan) (6). On all sequences, metallic artifact is minimal. Although metallic artifact increases or blooms with increased TR/TE in GRE images (D and E), amount of surrounding distortion is still minimal.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 15, 2021
January 15, 2021 — 
Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 Transmission electron micrograph of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, isolated from a patient. Image captured and color-enhanced at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility (IRF) in Fort Detrick, Maryland. Credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH

Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 Transmission electron micrograph of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, isolated from a patient. Image captured and color-enhanced at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility (IRF) in Fort Detrick, Maryland. Image courtesy of  National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | January 15, 2021
January 15, 2021 — In one of the first studies to examine the impact of the...
A, Contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted fat-saturated image from baseline MRI before initiation of neoadjuvant therapy shows irregular mass (arrow) in upper inner right breast corresponding to biopsy-proven carcinoma. B, Contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted fat-saturated image from follow-up MRI performed 3 months after initiation of neoadjuvant therapy shows decrease in size of right breast cancer (arrow). C, Contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted fat-saturated image 3 months after initiation of neoadjuvant the

A, Contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted fat-saturated image from baseline MRI before initiation of neoadjuvant therapy shows irregular mass (arrow) in upper inner right breast corresponding to biopsy-proven carcinoma. B, Contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted fat-saturated image from follow-up MRI performed 3 months after initiation of neoadjuvant therapy shows decrease in size of right breast cancer (arrow). C, Contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted fat-saturated image 3 months after initiation of neoadjuvant therapy shows new mass (arrow) in upper outer left breast that was assessed as BI-RADS 4. Pathologic examination from MRI-guided core biopsy of new suspicious mass revealed benign usual ductal hyperplasia. No atypia or malignancy was identified. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | MRI Breast | January 15, 2021
January 15, 2021 — According to ARRS' ...
A targeted intervention providing mammograms to hospitalized Medicaid patients can help patients complete overdue breast cancer screening

Getty Images

News | Mammography | January 14, 2021
January 14, 2021 — Completing cancer screening tests, such as...
Multidisciplinary functionality supports high-capacity utilization and economic efficiency
News | Mobile C-Arms | January 14, 2021
January 14, 2021 — Siemens Healthineers has announced the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance of the...
The "US Prostate Cancer Nuclear Medicine Diagnostics Market to 2027 - Country Analysis and Forecast by Type; PET Product" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering. The prostate cancer nuclear medicine diagnostics market in the US was valued at $194.47M in 2019 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 10.6% from 2020 to 2027 to reach $431.76M by 2027.

Getty Images

News | Prostate Cancer | January 13, 2021
January 13, 2021 — The ...
DB-I website features new educational tools and streamlined user experience to improve access to medically sourced breast density content
News | Breast Density | January 13, 2021
January 13, 2021 — DenseBreast-info.org (DB-I) invites he
Use of telehealth jumped sharply during the first months of the coronavirus pandemic shutdown, with the approach being used more often for behavioral health services than for medical care, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

Getty Images

News | Teleradiology | January 13, 2021
January 13, 2021 — Use of telehealth jumped sha