News | January 13, 2010

Stroke Patients Better Access Imaging, Treatment on Weekends

January 13, 2010 - Changes in staffing in the emergency department impact the availability of diagnostic modalities or treatmentment options for care. As a result, stroke patients admitted to the hospital on the weekend are more likely to receive the clot-dissolving medication tissue plasminogen activator than patients admitted during the week, according to a study in the January issue of Archives of Neurology.

A combination of factors, including shortages in resources, expertise and providers, may lead to less aggressive and lower quality care on the weekends vs. weekdays.

According to the authors, Abby S. Kazley, Ph.D., and colleagues at Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, differences in the aggressiveness of care may be explained by differences in access to equipment or clinicians, who might be busier with other patient care responsibilities during the week.

"Elective surgical procedures on weekends are rare, and this may contribute to decreased traffic and waiting time for diagnostic equipment, and result in quicker and more efficient diagnosis and determination of treatment," they wrote. "Reduced road traffic and job obligations on weekends may contribute to the possibility that patients with acute ischemic stroke arrive sooner at the hospital."

Although hospitals operate around the clock every day of the year, patients admitted on the weekends were 20 percent more likely to receive tissue plasminogen activator, which was administered to 229 weekend patients and 543 weekday patients. No statistically significant difference was observed in death rate between the two groups (3,993 patients admitted on weekdays died, compared with 1,420 admitted on weekends). The authors said the similarity in death rate indicates that patients who receive tissue plasminogen activator are more likely to die in the hospital than those who do not.

Despite the inconsistencies in care, the authors of the study found that stroke death rates appear similar among weekend and weekday admissions.

Reference: Arch Neurol. 2010;67(1):39-44).

For more information: www.jama.org

Related Content

Brain Imaging Predicts Language Learning in Deaf Children
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 23, 2018
January 23, 2018 – In a new international collaborative...
Imricor Announces Enrollment Completion for Clinical Study on Vision-MR Ablation Catheter
News | Interventional Radiology | January 23, 2018
January 23, 2018 – Imricor Medical Systems announced today the completion of enrollment for the...
Novel PET Tracer Clearly Identifies and Tracks Bacterial Lung Infection

Representative PET/CT images of 18F-FDS and 18F-FDG in inflamed mice. Mice were inoculated with dead K. pneumoniae (10^8 CFU/mL). Imaging was performed for days 1, 2, 3 and 4 using 18F-FDG and 18F-FDS. CT images showed clear inflammation on day 2 and day 3 with corresponding high 18F-FDG uptake on PET. No significant uptake of 18F-FDS was detected for any of those 4 days. Credit: J Li et al., University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Ky.

News | PET-CT | January 22, 2018
January 22, 2018 — Researchers at the University of Louisville, Kentucky, have demonstrated that a new...
Philips Introduces Technology Maximizer Program for Imaging Equipment Upgrades
Technology | Imaging | January 17, 2018
January 17, 2018 — Philips recently announced the launch of Technology Maximizer, a cross-modality program designed t
Russian Team Developing New Technology to Significantly Reduce MRI Research Costs
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 16, 2018
January 16, 2018 — Researchers from the NUST MISIS Engineering Center for Industrial Technologies in Russia have deve
Smartphone Addiction Creates Imbalance in Brain
News | Mobile Devices | January 11, 2018
Researchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to smartphones and the internet,...
Emergency Radiologists See Inner Toll of Opioid Use Disorders

Rates of Imaging Positivity for IV-SUDs Complications. Image courtesy of Efren J. Flores, M.D.

News | Clinical Study | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – Emergency radiologists are seeing a high prevalence of patients with complications related to opio
Study Finds No Evidence that Gadolinium Causes Neurologic Harm

MR images through, A, C, E, basal ganglia and, B, D, F, posterior fossa at level of dentate nucleus. Images are shown for, A, B, control group patient 4, and the, C, D, first and, E, F, last examinations performed in contrast group patient 13. Regions of interest used in quantification of signal intensity are shown as dashed lines for globus pallidus (green), thalamus (blue), dentate nucleus (yellow), and pons (red).

News | Contrast Media | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 — There is no evidence that accumulation in the brain of the element gadolinium speeds cognitive dec
Weight Loss Through Exercise Alone Does Not Protect Knees
News | Orthopedic Imaging | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – Obese people who lose a substantial amount of weight can significantly slow down the degeneration
Neurofeedback Shows Promise in Treating Tinnitus

The standard approach to fMRI neurofeedback. Image courtesy of Matthew Sherwood, Ph.D.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 — Researchers using...
Overlay Init