News | Medical 3-D Printing | March 01, 2016

Stratasys to Present Power of 3-D Printing at HIMSS 2016

Company will highlight healthcare applications, print-on-demand service

Stratasys Ltd., 3-D printing, HIMSS 2016

Neurosurgeons training on anatomically accurate Stratasys 3-D-printed models that incorporate soft and hard tissue. Photo courtesy of Business Wire.

March 1, 2016 — Stratasys Ltd., the 3-D printing and additive manufacturing solutions company, will be featured at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2016 conference and exhibition. This is the first time 3-D printing will be a part of the annual conference, which will take place Feb. 29 – Mar. 4 in Las Vegas.

The HIMSS annual conference and exhibition is the industry’s largest health information technology (IT) education and exhibit center. The meeting features new technologies that will shape the delivery of healthcare; Stratasys 3-D printing solutions will be highlighted with presentations, demonstrations, and displays.

Jack Stubbs, associate director, human performance in healthcare, University of Central Florida (UCF), in collaboration with Stratasys will be delivering the keynote session in the Intelligent Health Pavilion. His presentation on '3-D Printing – Reconstructing Healthcare' will take place Tuesday, March 1st from 10:00 pm - 10:30 pm. Attendees will learn how 3-D printing is playing an increasingly pivotal role in clinical education and training.

“I started using Stratasys 3-D printing solutions in 1996 to create prototype surgical devices. The latest advances in materials and print methods are enabling the development of sophisticated clinical training models that simulate real human environments in a very efficient and cost-effective manner,” explained Stubbs. “The ability to simulate soft tissue and hard bone in a single 3-D-printed model that is based on patient scans creates possibilities for high-impact training models not previously available. We’ve also implemented 3-D models throughout our research labs as anatomy parts, molds and fixtures for greater efficiency and to achieve our objectives.”

Stratasys 3-D printing solutions will also be on display in the IHP. Visitors can hold and evaluate 3-D-printed models of human anatomy, see a demonstration of the Objet260 Connex3 3-D printer, and speak with Stratasys experts in 3-D printed medical applications.

Advanced medical imaging and informatics company Vital Images will feature 3-D printing in its booth. On display will be a Stratasys uPrint SE Plus 3-D printer along with 3-D-printed anatomical models, rapid prototype tools, and prototypes for device testing and development. Visitors can learn more about the medical imaging industry’s first print-on-demand service, which uses Vital’s Vitrea advanced visualization software and Stratasys’ 3-D printing services. Vital Images' software takes patient scans and converts them into STL files that can be sent directly to a 3-D printer, improving workflow efficiency and 3-D printing accessibility.

For more information: www.stratasys.com

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