News | April 14, 2008

Stand-Alone Scanning Solution Says Goodbye to Workstation DICOM Viewer

April 15, 2008 - Merge Healthcare released its new stand-alone scanning solution, eFilm Scan 2.0, created to scan conventional medical films using third-party digitizers, and able to work without the eFilm Workstation desktop DICOM viewer.

Reportedly supporting all major film digitizers, the system provides TWAIN support for compliant flatbed scanners. Films may be scanned at various resolutions as 8-, 12-, or 16-bit grayscale images (depending on the digitizer), which can then be windowed/leveled, flipped, rotated, duplicated or segmented within eFilm Scan. Users can order these images and either send them as DICOM 3.0 studies, with relevant patient information, directly to a PACS or burned to CD.

Features include DICOM Sent, allowing the system to send directly to any DICOM sage device; MWL Query, a user can query a MWL SCU to obtain patient/study information, pre-populated with any information already entered into the patient tree node and finally Barcode Reader Support, allowing users to use a barcode reader to read barcodes and initiate a search of your MWL source or remove device.

Using the same feature set contained in eFilm 3.0, eFilm Scan allows you to burn all scanned images for a patient to a CD/DVD.

New display properties include improved session management, saving the state of the application when the application has been closed; display properties, allowing a user to set a gamma correction and OLE Automation, allowing third party applications applications to launch and pass information to eFilm Scan.

According to Merge, eFilm Scan provides an efficient way to digitize and migrate hardcopy films into a filmless environment for less than $2,300.

For more information: www.mergehealthcare.com

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