News | SPECT Imaging | December 06, 2018

Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition

Lawsuit centers on patents GE filed related to single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) technology

Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition

December 6, 2018 — Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cardiac imaging company Spectrum Dynamics filed a lawsuit Dec. 6, 2018, against GE Healthcare for theft and misappropriation of Spectrum Dynamics' trade secrets and intellectual property. The lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

The lawsuit alleges that GE deliberately, repeatedly and with fraudulent intent misappropriated Spectrum Dynamics' proprietary technology and know-how in nuclear medical (SPECT) imaging. According to Spectrum Dynamics, the technology has the potential to significantly improve clinical patient outcomes and reduce cost for hospitals and healthcare systems. The patents that GE filed relating to the technology and design of what would become the Spectrum Dynamics Veriton are based directly on Spectrum Dynamics' trade secrets and inventions, which were stolen by GE.

Spectrum Dynamics is seeking to prevent GE from developing, commercializing or otherwise using the trade secrets and novel ideas they stole from Spectrum Dynamics.

Spectrum Dynamics' lawsuit also claims unfair competition and further seeks to correct "inventorship" on GE patents, which claim Spectrum Dynamics' inventions, and obtain constructive ownership of the GE patents. Spectrum Dynamics is seeking both preliminary and permanent injunctive relief to prevent GE's continued exploitation of Spectrum's intellectual property.

Spectrum Dynamics' Veriton/Veriton-CT is the first multi-purpose, 12-detector SPECT scanning machine that allows for 360-degree, full-body contour scanning, according to the company. This produces three-dimensional coronary, bone and neuro images that are twice the image resolution of conventional cameras. It is also the first and only technically optimized design enabling the broad-based transition from analog to digital for the SPECT imaging equipment market.

Greenblum & Bernstein P.L.C. is serving as legal counsel to Spectrum Dynamics in connection with this matter.

For more information: www.spectrum-dynamics.com

Related Content

Rafael Rivero, M.D., Global Head of Medical Affairs at MSI, said: "The importance of MyoStrain cannot be understated because of the test's immense clinical value and ability to quantify intramyocardial dysfunction across 48 segments of the heart. In a six-heartbeat MRI scan, MyoStrain arms physicians with novel clinical information about a patient's heart health."
News | Cardiac Imaging | August 11, 2020
August 11, 2020 — Myocardial Solutions, Inc. and United Imaging, Inc.
SyntheticMR announced its imaging software SyMRI is compatible with additional scanners from Siemens Healthineers on the US market, including 1.5T scanners such as Magnetom Altea, Sola and Sola Fit, as well as 3T scanners such as MAGNETOM Skyra and Prisma.
News | Information Technology | August 11, 2020
August 11, 2020 — SyntheticMR announced its imaging softwar
As part of an international collaboration, researchers from Aarhus University and University of Leicester have succeeded in developing a dynamic 3-D CT scanning method that shows what happens inside the body during simulated heart massage

A look inside cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A 4-D computed tomography model of simulated closed chest compression. A proof of concept. Courtesy of Kasper Hansen/Jonathan Bjerg Moeller/Aarhus University

News | Cardiac Imaging | August 07, 2020
August 7, 2020 — Rapid first aid during...
Versatile, future-proof digital imaging unit scales to meet growing technology needs of customers
News | Digital Radiography (DR) | August 06, 2020
August 6, 2020 — Carestream Health has launched its...
Ghost imaging approach could enable detailed movies of the heart with low-dose X-rays

Researchers developed a high-resolution X-ray imaging technique based on ghost imaging that can capture the motion of rapidly moving objects. They used it to create a movie of a blade rotating at 100,000 frames per second. Image courtesy of Sharon Shwartz, Bar-Ilan University

News | X-Ray | August 06, 2020
August 6, 2020 — Researche...
New Medical Imaging and Data Resource Center will aid AI development and medical advancement to battle COVID-19

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | August 05, 2020
August 5, 2020 — The nation’s largest medical imaging associations are working together to develop the new Medical Im