News | October 05, 2010

Spanish-Language Resource for Breast Cancer Information

October 5, 2010 — In recognition of the start of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the Images of Health Website, imagesofhealth.com, has been relaunched, including a Spanish-language version, retratosdesalud.com. Established to promote the importance of early detection of breast cancer, the Website focuses on the sharing of inspirational stories to drive donations to the National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF).

The Spanish-language Website features a facility locator that offers a searchable list of mammography screening facilities providing Spanish-speaking technologists or interpreting services. There is also a downloadable, printable brochure and access to a wide range of mammography and breast health information and resources in Spanish.

Studies show that only 38 percent of Hispanic women age 40 and older have regular screening mammograms, and breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among Hispanic women in the United States.

The National Breast Cancer Foundation, based in Frisco, Texas, has been a partner of Fujifilm’s Images of Health since its inception. At the IOH Website, users are encouraged to share their inspirational stories about breast cancer, the importance of mammography and advice for healthy living. Fujifilm will donate $1 for each story shared, $2 for each story with a photo posted and $2 for each video, with a commitment of up to $50,000 going to the NBCF.

Fujifilm’s other IOH initiatives include the donation of an Aspire ClearView full-field digital mammography (FFDM) system, seeking — together with the NBCF — to bring advanced imaging technology to a healthcare facility that currently does not offer digital.

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