Technology | October 20, 2014

Sony Highlights New Medical Printers at RSNA 2014

October 20, 2014 — Sony Electronics’ Medical Systems Division is highlighting four new medical printers at RSNA 2014: models UP-D898MD, UP-X898MD, UP-991AD and UP-971AD. Each new model is Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Class II, 510(k) cleared. The new printers are designed for increased efficiency and performance in a range of radiology applications, including ultrasound, portable C-Arm and cardiac cath labs.

The UP-D898MD and UP-X898MD B/W ultrasound printers are designed for today’s advanced ultrasound systems with high-speed printing times of approximately 1.9 seconds, high resolution of 325 dpi and a compact, space-saving design. The front panel adds a jog dial for more user-friendly control, and built-in digital capture lets users store images on a connected USB drive. Both use the same media as their predecessor Sony models. The UP-X898MD printer is also a hybrid model, accepting both analog and digital signal inputs.

The Sony UP-991AD and UP-971AD are black-and-white hybrid printers that support both analog and digital signals. Both printers have an analog video input as well as a USB 2.0 high-speed interface for digital printing. This dual compatibility is especially critical as imaging systems make the transition from analog to digital technology. The printers’ compact design with a front-panel LCD display provides for easy operation and easy integration into most cart-based imaging systems. The printers deliver high-speed printing times of approximately 8 seconds.

The UP-991AD printer adds an optional blue transparency film, automatic detection of paper or film and a fully automatic media cutter.

The UP-991AD prints full page for film or paper, while the UP-971AD model prints paper only.

The UP-991AD and UP-X898MD models also offer “print, store and go” capabilities with Sony’s IMAGEPORT interface. This allows users to print images, store them on a USB drive and transfer them to a laptop. The IMAGEPORT interface also uses the blue thermal media to produce high-quality, film-like transparencies.

The Sony UP-D898MD, UP-X898MD, UP-991AD and UP-971AD printers are available now.   

For more information: www.pro.sony.com/bbsc/ssr/mkt-medical/

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