News | Mammography | September 14, 2018

Solis Mammography Offers 93 Percent More Comfort During Mammograms

New technology increases accuracy and comfort, reduces excuses to neglect breast wellness

SmartCurve technology, a revolutionary breast imaging technology designed specifically for the curvature of the female breast to provide every woman with a more comfortable and accurate mammogram.

Solis Mammography declared September Breast Wellness Month and encouraging every woman to #DitchTheSquish with the launch of SmartCurve technology in its 50+ centers across the country. Building on more than 30 years of expertise, Solis Mammography is a provider of SmartCurve technology, a revolutionary breast imaging technology designed specifically for the curvature of the female breast to provide every woman with a more comfortable and accurate mammogram.

Stephen Rose, M.D., Solis Mammography's director of clinical research, was one of the pioneers, in partnership with Hologic, to develop the SmartCurv technology. 

"For decades, Solis Mammography has been shaping the future of mammograms in both the imaging technology innovation, as well as the entire experience for women," said Rose. "We're celebrating women this month by launching SmartCurve technology in all of our centers nationwide. We're continually thinking ahead of the curve to deliver the best breast wellness experience for women. And we're activating the conversation around the topic through our Every Woman campaign to offer women a safe platform to talk about breast health and body image as part of their self-care regimen."

SmartCurve technology provides a more comfortable experience that integrates 3D technology for even greater accuracy. SmartCurve technology has a curved compression surface that mirrors the shape of a woman's breast for ultimate comfort and accuracy. This revolutionary technology improves the patient experience by 93 percent, reduces calls back for negative-positives up to 40 percent and detects an average of 48 percent more invasive breast cancers.

Since the invention of the mammogram in 1960, women have been subjected to rudimentary technology that bent toward practicality and neglected the female form. They have been advised by their physicians to get their annual mammogram as a sterile, standard test, instead of a vital, self-care regimen. Solis Mammography is empowering women to embrace the new technology that now echoes their shape and to step up as breast wellness advocates to take control of their breast health by:

  • Celebrating September as Breast Wellness Month, ahead of Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October.
  • Taking the time to perform a self-breast exam.
  • Scheduling a mammogram.
  • Encouraging their loved ones to practice breast health.
  • Engaging with Solis Mammography's #EveryWoman campaign.
  • Sharing images of themselves celebrating their breast wellness at home and at mammogram centers using #DitchTheSquish and tagging or nominating their friends to follow their example.

 

For more information: SolisMammo.com

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