News | October 07, 2013

SNMMI Celebrates Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Week

Society looks to future advances in the field

Oct. 7, 2013 -- To recognize the advances in the field of nuclear and molecular imaging, as well as the professionals who carry out these procedures, the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) and the SNMMI Technologist Section (SNMMI-TS) celebrate Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Week, Oct. 6-12, 2013. The theme of this year’s Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Week is “Molecular Imaging: The Future … Delivered.”

The SNMMI and SNMMI-TS have compiled a list of the advances being made within the field today that will impact the future of healthcare. “The nuclear medicine and molecular imaging research currently being conducted has the potential to expand our field in a significant way and enhance ‘personalized medicine’,” noted Gary Dillehay, MD, FACNM, FACR, current president of the SNMMI. “From new imaging tracers  to expanded use of radionuclide therapy to improved dose optimization, there is much to look forward to in the coming years.”

Advances being made in the field include:

  • New tracers, such as 18F-FLT, 18F-FMISO and 68Ga-DOTATOC for oncology treatment monitoring.
  • Expanded uses for new nuclear medicine therapies, such as 223-Radium dichloride.
  • Further development of optical imaging for clinical use.
  • Integration of molecular imaging into clinical trials to determine the effectiveness of treatments.
  • Consensus guidelines for dose optimization in nuclear medicine procedures.

A toolkit has also been developed for nuclear and molecular imaging professionals to celebrate Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Week. The toolkit includes a fact sheet, sample letter to government officials, sample media materials and suggested activities for the week—including issuing a public service announcement, holding an open house of the nuclear and molecular imaging department for the public and hosting an appreciation luncheon for employees. Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Week t-shirts, lunch bags, pens and more are also available for purchase.

“Now more than ever, it is important that we educate others—patients, referring physicians, students, and even politicians—on the utility of nuclear medicine procedures and their benefits over other treatment and imaging modalities,” said Scott Holbrook, BS, CNMT, FSNMMI-TS, president for the SNMMI-TS. “Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Week is an opportune time to share with others the impact our field has on the well-being of patients.”

More than 17 million Americans undergo nuclear medicine procedures each year for a variety of conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurological conditions and other physiological problems. Nuclear medicine and molecular imaging procedures are an invaluable way to gather medical information that would otherwise be unavailable, require surgery or necessitate more expensive diagnostic tests.

For more information: www.snmmi.org

Related Content

DOSIsoft Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance for Planet Onco Dose Software
Technology | Information Technology | June 20, 2019
DOSIsoft announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market Planet...
United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Install of uMI 550 Digital PET/CT System
News | PET-CT | June 19, 2019
United Imaging announced the first U.S. clinical installation of the uMI 550 Digital positron emission tomography/...
International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines

X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019
An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for...
A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse

Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2019
The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular...
BGN Technologies Introduces Novel Medical Imaging Radioisotope Production Method
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | June 05, 2019
BGN Technologies, the technology transfer company of Ben-Gurion University (BGU), introduced a novel method for...
Study Explores Magnetic Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agent for PET/MRI

Image courtesy of MR Solutions.

News | PET-MRI | May 23, 2019
Researchers from Bourgogne University in Dijon, France, showed that use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (...
New Phase 2B Trial Exploring Target-Specific Myocardial Ischemia Imaging Agent
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 17, 2019
Biopharmaceutical company CellPoint plans to begin patient recruitment for its Phase 2b cardiovascular imaging study in...
Blue Earth Diagnostics Expands Access to Axumin in Europe
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 13, 2019
Blue Earth Diagnostics announced expanded access to the Axumin (fluciclovine (18F)) imaging agent in Europe. The first...
Shine Medical Technologies Breaks Ground on U.S. Medical Isotope Production Facility

Image courtesy of Amen Clinics

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 10, 2019 | Jeff Zagoudis, Associate Editor
Shine Medical Technologies Inc. broke ground on their first medical isotope production facility in Janesville, Wis. U.S...
A 3-D printed tungsten X-ray system collimator. 3D printed, additive manufacturing for medical imaging.

A 3-D printed tungsten X-ray system collimator. The tungsten alloy powder is printed into the form desired and is laser fused so it can be machined and finished. Previously, making collimators from Tungsten was labor intensive because it required working with sheets of the metal to create the collimator matrix. 

Feature | Medical 3-D Printing | April 29, 2019 | By Steve Jeffery
In ...