News | Breast Imaging | February 09, 2021

SmartBreast Forms Molecular Breast Imaging Partnership with FITI

After acquiring the molecular breast imaging (MBI) assets from GE Healthcare and Dilon Technologies, Inc., SmartBreast Corporation (SmartBreast), a privately held company focused on breast cancer screening and diagnosis, announced today that it has formed a partnership with FoxSemicon Integrated Technologies, Inc. (FITI) to manufacture molecular breast imaging (MBI) systems.

February 9, 2021 — After acquiring the molecular breast imaging (MBI) assets from GE Healthcare and Dilon Technologies, Inc., SmartBreast Corporation (SmartBreast), a privately held company focused on breast cancer screening and diagnosis, announced today that it has formed a partnership with FoxSemicon Integrated Technologies, Inc. (FITI) to manufacture molecular breast imaging (MBI) systems.

FITI has invested substantially in SmartBreast and will be the contract manufacturer for two MBI systems recently acquired by SmartBreast: the GE Healthcare Discovery NM 750b and the Dilon Technologies D6800. SmartBreast will rebrand the two systems as "EVE CLEAR SCAN" e750 and e680, respectively. Together, SmartBreast and FITI will co-develop and manufacture innovative, cost-effective, next-generation MBI systems to further increase the efficacy of detecting cancer in the earlier stage. We will integrate stereotactic MBI-guided biopsy and 3D-MBI technology to further enhance functionality.

MBI saves lives by detecting breast cancer earlier in women with dense breasts, who comprise about 40% of American, European and African women and 70% of Asian women. MBI sees through dense breast tissue and finds cancers that mammography misses. In a published clinical study with one-year follow up of 1585 women with dense breasts, researchers at the Mayo Clinic reported that mammography found 3.2 cancers per 1,000 women with dense breasts. Adding low-dose MBI increased the number of cancers found to 12 per 1,000.

"FITI is excited to partner with SmartBreast to help women around the world with the earlier detection of cancer in dense breast tissue," says Kevin Chiu, CEO and President of FITI. "We are proud to invest in and work with SmartBreast to provide highly effective MBI systems for women around the world."

According to James Hugg, M.D., SmartBreast CEO and President, "We are executing a strategy to grow SmartBreast to become the largest global player in the secondary screening and diagnostics market for women with dense breasts by providing the most effective tool for locating and diagnosing cancers occult on mammography. We acquired the Dilon Technologies D6800 and GE Healthcare's Discovery NM 750b MBI product lines, consolidating clinically proven reliable products with 217 installations globally. SmartBreast, working with our manufacturing partner FITI, will make MBI available to all dense breast patients who are woefully in need of better cancer discovery and diagnostic tools."

For more information: www.smartbreast.com

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