Technology | May 05, 2009

SIERRA Advantage Film Digitizer for Teleradiology, Imaging Centers

May 4, 2009 - VIDAR Systems Corp. will showcase its newest addition to the Advantage film digitizer product line – the SIERRA Advantage – at the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine
(SIIM) Annual Meeting, June 4-7, 2009, in Charlotte, NC.

The American College of Radiology compliant SIERRA Advantage is the digitizer of choice for teleradiology applications, small imaging centers, emergency rooms and price sensitive applications. Because of its compact size, price point, workflow enhancing feature list, and clinically proven image quality, the SIERRA Advantage can be used in a variety of healthcare settings.

New feature enhancements in the SIERRA Advantage include an LED light source for improved reliability and lower total cost of ownership; a USB 2 interface for ease of integration; faster scan times – only 30 seconds for a full size film at 2 x 2.5K; and a single or 10-sheet film feeder.

Light weight, combined with its small size — about that of a one-panel light box — makes the wall-mountable SIERRA Advantage ideal for crowded, low volume radiology offices, imaging centers, and hospitals where space is often at a premium. It also means that the SIERRA Advantage can be deployed in a number of other settings where quick access to high-quality electronic images would enhance patient care, such as the emergency department, intensive and coronary care units, teaching hospitals and alternate care settings. Because the product features VIDAR’s next-generation proprietary High Definition CCD technology and automatic digitizer calibration, it needs virtually no maintenance or calibration.

For more information: www.vidar.com

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