News | Population Health | January 11, 2017

Siemens, Northwell Health Research Partner to Improve Outcomes, Reduce Costs Using Population Health

Study will help determine best imaging modality for each patient based on population health big data analytics

Siemens, Northwell Health Research, population health study, improve outcomes

January 11, 2017 — With a common vision focused on improving health outcomes and reducing healthcare spending, Siemens Healthineers and Northwell Health recently announced a research partnership aimed at developing research projects centered on clinical effectiveness and outcomes research utilizing data analytics-based population health evidence. In addition to its funding and research support over the next four years to Northwell Health’s Imaging Clinical Effectiveness and Outcomes Research (iCEOR) Program, Siemens Healthineers will dispatch dedicated full-time employees to work jointly with Northwell Health on outcomes-based research projects and population health management efforts.

Preliminary results from the partnership’s first study, the “Value of Advanced Imaging in Improving Health Outcomes and Healthcare Spending in Acute Stroke1,” indicate that advanced imaging is preferred in acute stroke care leading to improved long-term health outcomes. The principal investigator, Pina Sanelli, M.D., vice chair for research at Northwell Health, noted that the optimal choice of computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) varies by patient’s specific characteristics, promoting a patient-centered imaging approach in which each patient will receive the imaging exam that will result in best outcomes based on their own personal features. These early findings suggest that further investigation is needed to perform a more-comprehensive analysis of the long-term benefits, harms and costs for different imaging approaches in acute stroke care incorporating a variety of personal characteristics.

For more information: www.healthcare.siemens.com

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