News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | March 13, 2018

Siemens Healthineers Introduces Portable Cardiovascular-Dedicated Ultrasound at ACC.18

System addresses increasing demand for quality echo exams in more locations and fast-paced clinical environments

Siemens Healthineers Introduces Portable Cardiovascular-Dedicated Ultrasound at ACC.18

March 13, 2018 — At the American College of Cardiology’s (ACC) 67th Annual Scientific Session and Expo, March 10-12 in Orlando, Fla., Siemens Healthineers launched its new portable cardiovascular ultrasound solution, the Acuson Bonsai.

According to a recent study, 34 million echo exams were performed in the U.S. in 2017.1 The Acuson Bonsai addresses the challenge of these increased clinician workloads by providing a portable and quick system, while maintaining high-quality imaging and diagnostic confidence through user-friendly applications. The system was created together with Mindray Medical International Ltd.

In one portable system, the Acuson Bonsai provides one-touch image optimization and advanced imaging. The system automatically optimizes the ultrasound image with the touch of a button, eliminating the need for manual optimization on the part of the sonographer for improved workflow and image quality consistency. The system also utilizes advanced imaging to optimize specific to routine echocardiograms and cardiovascular workflows.

The Acuson Bonsai is compatible with a comprehensive set of 14 transthoracic echo (TTE) and transesophageal echo (TEE) transducers.

The system comes fully loaded with a complete set of user-friendly cardiology applications for fast and easy handling of routine echo exams. Included applications such as “Auto EF” for semi-automatic ejection fraction measurements and “Auto IMT” for automatic intima-media thickness measurements help clinicians acquire measurements in one click, which enables quicker exams and consistent and reproducible results.

The ultra-portable and ergonomic user design of the Acuson Bonsai’s laptop and mobile cart system offers flexibility in scanning locations. The laptop is over 1.7 cm thinner than the industrial average, according to Siemens, and its companion cart has a slim design and small footprint for maneuverability. Automated protocols reduce scan times up to 43 percent2 and reduce keystrokes up to 75 percent2, improving workflows and patient throughput. Raw Data capabilities on the system can also improve scan times and allow for flexibility with image optimization and measurements after the acquisition.

For more information: www.usa.healthcare.siemens.com

References

1. Arlington Medical Research, Echo monitor report 2017

2. The Role of a Protocol Management Feature in Improving Ultrasound Lab Efficiency, 2016

 

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