News | Radiology Imaging | January 26, 2017

Siemens Healthineers Adds 1,000 Imaging Courses to PEPconnect Online Learning Platform

Expanded platform provides customers with virtual anywhere/anytime access to education and real-time performance support materials via any device

Siemens Healthineers, PEPconnect online learning platform, 1,000 new courses, Personalized Education Plan

January 26, 2017 — Siemens Healthineers has announced the expansion of its online learning platform PEPconnect (Personalized Education Plan) to include approximately 1,000 new learning modules for medical imaging customers. Effective immediately, physicians and medical technology assistants can use PEPconnect to access training courses on Siemens Healthineers systems for imaging and minimally invasive therapy in seven different languages: English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Korean and Japanese.

A personalized education and performance experience for the healthcare professional, PEPconnect and its forerunner platform, PEP, were initially designed to offer training and professional development primarily in the area of laboratory diagnostics, with the company providing a separate set of learning tools for U.S. imaging customers via its now-shuttered Siemens Learning Center (SLC). In an effort to create a single streamlined virtual education experience for all healthcare customers globally, Siemens Healthineers has migrated the SLC imaging modules and their 50,000 users to PEPconnect, bringing the total number of learning modules on the PEPconnect platform to 7,000 – and the total number of PEPconnect users to 150,000.

Additionally, Siemens Healthineers is offering former SLC users access to new social media features as well as compatibility with mobile devices. With optimized technology and increased search capabilities, PEPconnect allows customers to access education and real-time performance support virtually anytime, anywhere and on any device, including PCs, laptops, tablets and smartphones. Also, customers can construct a personalized learning experience and share learning with others — whenever and wherever needed.

For more information: www.usa.healthcare.siemens.com

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