News | September 18, 2012

Rising Cost of Inpatient Care Linked to Medical Devices, Not Imaging

Supplies and devices, such as stents, accounted for the largest proportion of hospital inpatient cost increases between 2001 and 2006.

MRI Systems Clinical Trial/Study Stents Cath Lab Health Service Research

September 18, 2012 — Inpatient hospital treatment accounts for the largest proportion of healthcare spending in the United States, with the use of diagnostic imaging services such as magnetic resonance images (MRIs) frequently implicated as the probable cause. A new analysis finds that the biggest expense may not be from imaging technology, but from supplies including medical devices, such as stents and artificial joints.

“One of the takeaway messages for hospitals is that they should examine their own data in closer detail to explore the costs that are rapidly rising and have a better understanding for the underlying reasons,” said lead author Jared Lane Maeda, Ph.D., of Truven Health Analytics in Washington, D.C.

The study — released in Health Services Research — used the 2001 and 2006 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases and Medicare Cost Reports for community, non-rehabilitation hospitals in nine states. The researchers conducted a cost analysis on more than 10.2 million patient discharges for various conditions.

At 24.2 percent of costs, “supplies and devices,” (defined as the “supply items required for patient care”) were the leading contributors to the increase in average cost per discharge. Intensive care unit charges contributed 17.6 percent, and room and board for a semi-private room was 11.3 percent. Imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) scans, and other advanced technological services contributed just 4.9 percent. The significant growth in the mean cost per discharge of supplies and devices suggests they should be examined more closely.

Caroline Steinberg, vice president of Trends Analysis for the American Hospital Association, said the group supports comparative effectiveness research to determine whether new drugs and devices are both clinically and cost effective. “This is an area where more research is needed,” she added. “And as for increased use of the intensive care unit, that is consistent with the trend towards older and sicker patients.”

Maeda added that payers might consider negotiating discounts in areas of care and cost that are growing quickly.

For more information: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1475-6773/

Related Content

SyMRI Software Receives FDA Clearance for Use With Siemens MRI Systems
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 14, 2019
SyntheticMR announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for clinical use of its SyMRI Image and SyMRI...
A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse

Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2019
The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular...
Study Identifies MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy as Growing Market Segment
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | June 06, 2019
Revenues from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided radiation therapy systems market exceeded $220 million in...
Ann Arbor Startup Launches Augmented Reality MRI Simulator
Technology | Virtual and Augmented Reality | June 04, 2019
SpellBound, an Ann Arbor startup specializing in augmented reality (AR) tools for children in hospitals, has officially...
AI Biomarker Demonstrates High Predictive Power for Lung Cancer Immunotherapy
News | Artificial Intelligence | May 31, 2019
Lunit announced an abstract presentation of its artificial intelligence (AI) precision medicine research portfolio at...

Photo courtesy of Philips Healthcare

Feature | Radiology Business | May 31, 2019 | By Arjen Radder
Change is a consistent theme in our world today, no matter where you look.
Dynamic Digital Radiography Used to Assess Undifferentiated Dyspnea
News | Digital Radiography (DR) | May 29, 2019
A clinical study presented at the American Thoracic Society (ATS) 2019 annual meeting, May 17-22 in Dallas, described...
Leica Biosystems Receives FDA Clearance for Aperio AT2 DX Digital Pathology System
Technology | Digital Pathology | May 29, 2019
Leica Biosystems has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its Aperio AT2 DX...
New Blood Test Detects Colorectal Cancer Recurrence Up to 16.5 Months Earlier
News | Oncology Diagnostics | May 28, 2019
A new clinical study shows that Natera's Signatera test identified colorectal cancer recurrence up to 16.5 months...
MRI Metal Artifact Reduction Poses Minimal Thermal Risk to Hip Arthroplasty Implants
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 23, 2019
Clinical metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols at 3 Tesla (3T) on hip...