Technology | May 24, 2011

RIS Updates Offer Comprehensive Solutions

May 24, 2011 – Sectra’s Web-based radiology information system (RIS) for the North American market is a scalable, comprehensive solution with advanced scheduling features, management tools, a referring physician portal and single desktop integration to Sectra picture archiving and communications system (PACS). New RIS features improve radiologists’ productivity, speed reports and improve exam quality.

One improvement — Sectra embeds Nuance’s latest PowerScribe Speech Recognition into its RIS to provide a seamless experience for radiologists. New features include improved presentation of prior reports and external documents, as well as voice-driven commands to speed dictation, BI-RADS coding and report generation.

Another feature, Protocol Worklist, allows a radiologist to efficiently review clinical information and select or change the technical protocol for a procedure as needed. This helps to improve the quality of an exam and patient care as well as reduce the need for re-takes. A resident reading workflow module allows a resident to dictate a preliminary diagnostic report, which is then sent to an attending radiologist’s worklist for approval. The attending can either approve the report or send it back to the resident (with comments) for correction.

Batch printing enables batch printing to be configured separately by facility and priority. Reports can be routed based on patient locations, physician departments, exam rooms and facilities. Batches can also be scheduled. Also, Sectra RIS meets wait time information system (WTIS) requirements for scheduling exams, exam reason codes, exam priorities and HL7 integration. WTIS is an Ontario, Canada, healthcare initiative comprised of a centralized provincial system that captures and tracks exam time from order to report approval/completion.

For more information: www.futureproofpacs.com

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