News | Radiology Business | February 29, 2016

Richardson Healthcare Announces New European Headquarters in Amsterdam

New location will allow easy shipment of imaging replacement parts through Europe, the Middle East and Africa

February 29, 2016 — Richardson Healthcare, a division of Richardson Electronics Ltd., announced the opening of its diagnostic imaging replacement parts and training center in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Adding a center in Europe is a direct response to Europe’s growing demand for high-quality, cost-effective parts to help lower the cost of healthcare.

The Amsterdam facility will include quality assurance testing bays, classrooms, and replacement parts inventory, representing an extension of the offerings and expertise of International Medical Equipment and Service (IMES) located in Fort Mill, S.C. Richardson Electronics acquired IMES in June 2015. The new facility is co-located with Richardson Electronics European distribution hub making it ideal for shipping replacement parts quickly and cost effectively throughout Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

Richardson Healthcare will be exhibiting at the European Congress of Radiology show in Vienna, Austria, March 3-6, and will be showcasing high-value solutions for diagnostic imaging. Highlights include:

  • High-quality replacement parts, tubes, technical support and service training for major brands of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment;
  • Thales’ ArtPix EZ2GO digital radiography (DR) system, an easy and affordable solution for migrating from analog or computed radiography to DR; and
  • On-demand MRI coil solutions.

For more information: www.rellhealthcare.com

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