Technology | July 25, 2011

RFID Tracking and Verification System Featured at AAPM

July 25, 2011 – Civco Medical Solutions is showcasing its RFSuite radio frequency identification (RFID) tracking and verification system at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Civco also is hosting an RFSuite Symposium, from 12:30 – 2 p.m Monday, Aug. 1, in the Mackenzie Ballroom at the Fairmont Waterfront, Vancouver. The event will include lunch. Pre-registration is required, and spots are still available.

The symposium will include several speakers experienced with RFID technology, including Todd Pawlicki, Ph.D., director of medical physics and clinical operations at Moores Cancer Center in San Diego, Calif., and Alfredo Siochi, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of medical physics education in the department of radiation oncology at the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics in Iowa City, Iowa. Moores Cancer Center has been using Civco’s RFSuite for nearly a year.

Civco will also sponsor an RFID and workflow consortium at AAPM to learn more about the clinical benefits of RF technology.  

The RFSuite system uses RFID technology to track patients, staff and equipment and to provide accessory and patient identity verification for treatment. “The use of RFID technology provides real-time information about resource availability and pending tasks,” said Siochi. “Schedule optimization could match resources to tasks and in our RFID simulation study, this reduced patient wait times by 30 minutes.”

The RFSuite software, RFTrak, provides a snapshot of where people and items are located in a facility in real time, improving workflow and reducing patient wait time. Civco’s RFSeries line provides a broad array of RFID enabled products.

“RFID technology is uniquely positioned to have a major impact in radiation oncology,” said Pawlicki. “In addition to equipment and resource tracking, RFID will provide the real-time process data that can be used as the basis for comprehensive performance and safety programs. We look forward to working with Civco in developing its RFID technology as a key component of our data-driven improvement approaches, such as Lean or Six Sigma.”

For more information: www.Civco.com

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