Technology | November 24, 2009

Researchers Get Free 2D/3D Application

November 24, 2009 - The academic and research communities can access free 2D/3D Windows-based software for reviewing imaging data from CT, MR, PET, ultrasound and X-ray.

This Web-based software, zioTerm, will provide students and researchers, who often do not have access to quality state of the art imaging tools, the opportunity to gain knowledge and experience using core 2D/3D software for DICOM images.

The company providing the free software, Ziosoft Inc., says it is offering zioTerm software at no cost to gain exposure and increase interest in its full-featured Ziostation thin-client system.

Although the zioTerm software is currently intended for educational purposes, it will eventually be released globally for diagnostic use, in compliance with regulatory bodies worldwide. In the meantime, offering the product to the academic community will help Ziosoft to gain valuable user experience and feedback on the zioTerm software. RSNA attendees can register for the free zioTerm software.

For more information: www.ziosoftinc.com

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