News | September 25, 2008

Real-time Surgery Feedback Could Improve Orthopedic Implants

September 26, 2008 - A software grant that could lead to orthopedic surgeons being able to immediately gauge the effectiveness of implanted joints has been announced by LifeModeler Inc.

The company, a global provider of biomechanical human body simulation tools and services, will provide $400,000
of software and services to InMotion Musculoskeletal Institute and the University of Memphis.

The LifeMOD grant will help the scientific staff at InMotion create kinematic models that will aid in the development of tools allowing surgeons to immediately test the fit of implanted devices such as knees, hips and spinal correction. Together, there were more than 900,000 such surgeries in the U.S. last year.

According to John Williams, M.D., director of biomechanics at InMotion and professor at the University of Memphis Department of Biomedical Engineering, “This software could be developed to give nearly real-time data on how the implant will move in the body under different conditions like walking, climbing stairs and even playing golf.”

For more information: www.inmotionmemphis.org, www.lifemodeler.com

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