News | Clinical Decision Support | March 30, 2017

Radiology-TEACHES Wins ABIM Foundation Creating Value Challenge

Online portal provides case vignettes to simulate ordering of imaging studies via integrated clinical decision support

ACR, Radiology-TEACHES online portal, clinical decision support, CDS, ABIM Foundation, Creating Value Challenge

March 30, 2017 — Radiology-TEACHES, an online portal led by principal investigator Marc H. Willis, DO, recently earned the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation, Costs of Care and Leapfrog Group Creating Value Challenge “Teaching Value” Award. 

This competition is aimed at recognizing innovative ideas and projects for teaching and implementing high-value healthcare among collaborative teams of clinicians, educators, quality improvement specialists and health system administrators. 

Radiology-TEACHES is an online portal that uses case vignettes in the American College of Radiology’s (ACR) Radiology Case Management System (RCMS) integrated with the ACR Select clinical decision support (CDS) to simulate the process of ordering imaging studies via integrated CDS. Learners, including medical students, receive this evidence-based feedback at the virtual point of order entry, thereby better understanding appropriate imaging utilization and empowering them to reduce waste. 

Recognizing that medical education curricula often lack evidence-based guidance regarding appropriateness and cost of imaging examinations, radiologists at Baylor College of Medicine partnered with the ACR and the National Decision Support Company to create Radiology-TEACHES (Technology Enhanced Appropriateness Criteria Home for Education Simulation). 

Radiology Support, Communication and Alignment Network (R-SCAN): Promoting Imaging Stewardship in the Age of Value, was a finalist in the “Creating Value” track. Led by Max Wintermark, M.D., R-SCAN’s goal is to ensure that every patient gets the most appropriate imaging test at the right time and for the right reason. R-SCAN’s core component is a collaboration between radiologists and referring clinicians to streamline imaging exam ordering in a sustainable fashion by teaching and implementing imaging-focused Choosing Wisely recommendations. These topics selected for the R-SCAN program are endorsed by multiple medical societies and aligned with the ACR’s evidence-based Appropriateness Criteria. R-SCAN actively collaborates with various medical professional societies to promote multi-specialty involvement. 

Creating Value Challenge winners will be recognized and present their projects at the Association of American Medical Colleges Integrating Quality (AAMC IQ) meeting June 8–9, 2017 near Chicago.

Click here to view a Radiology-TEACHES video presentation.

For more information: www.acr.org

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