News | June 21, 2009

Radiology Specialty Networks Refer 44 Percent of Workers’ Comp Patients

June 22, 2009 - Diagnostic radiology specialty networks are responsible for directing 44 percent of workers’ compensation patients seen by the imaging centers, and for 18 percent of patients with health insurance, according to a survey of 140 independent U.S.-based imaging centers conducted by Lead Generation Solutions and commissioned by One Call Medical.

The study underscores play a critical role in channeling patients to imaging centers for both workers’ compensation and health insurance patients, and concludes that without the specialized intervention these networks provide, workers’ compensation patients may end up at a more costly uncredentialed facility that is not part of a managed network.

“The survey reveals a new and important trend—that diagnostic radiology specialty networks are now referring a significant and growing portion of the patients who require advanced radiology services,” said Don Duford, president and COO of One Call Medical. “Our providers also receive significant value in terms of a higher volume of referrals and prompt payment.”

The study surveyed imaging centers on their level of awareness of the various diagnostic radiology networks. One Call Medical was identified as having the highest level of awareness in the workers’ compensation arena, by a factor of more than three times that of the nearest competitor. In the group health space, a segment recently entered by One Call Medical, its awareness is equivalent to one of the largest firms already established in this sector.

The study also polled imaging centers on the most valued attributes of a scheduling center, and asked respondents to rank the specialty networks according to these criteria: clear contract and service requirements; good provider service, which made the network easy to work with; timely and accurate payments; and delivering increased patient volume.

“One Call Medical strives to provide our radiologists with outstanding benefits, including more patients, prompt payment, and ongoing marketing opportunities,” noted Duford. “As a result, we’re gratified to see strong and positive perceptions of the value we deliver to the provider community. One especially critical perception that providers appreciate is prompt and accurate payments: we pay our providers within contractual terms without fail, even if we have not received payment from the payer. In the few instances where there is a question on payment, we aggressively respond to ensure clarity and satisfaction. These positive relationships with our providers enable us to deliver high quality, cost-effective services to payers. Imaging centers not only experience an increased number of referrals, but they also eliminate collection problems that occur with other claims, a significant benefit in these economic times.”

For more information: www.onecallmedical.com/default/providers/network.aspx onecallmedical.com

Related Content

At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve).

At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve). Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 22, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Reflecting a trend toward the increased use of...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 17, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Virtual reality (VR) and its less immersive kin, augmented reality (AR), are gaining traction in some medical applica
WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography.

WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography. Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 16, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Machine learning is already having an enormous impact on cardiology, automatically calculating measurements in echoca
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 15, 2019
Debate About Coronary Testing Highlights ACC Session
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 12, 2019
How smart algorithms might reduce the burden of modern practice
Collage provided by Albert Hsiao

Collage depicts broad applications in machine learning or deep learning (DL) that can be applied to advanced medical imaging technologies. Size of the liver and its fat fraction — 22 percent — (top middle in collage) can be quantified automatically using an algorithm developed by Dr. Albert Hsiao and his team at the University of California San Diego. This and other information that might be mined by DL algorithms from CT and MR images could help personalize patients’ treatment. Collage provided by Albert Hsiao

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 11, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are chock full of information that might be used
Carestream Health has signed an agreement to sell its healthcare information systems (HCIS) business to Philips Healthcare. Image by geralt on Pixabay

Carestream Health has signed an agreement to sell its healthcare information systems (HCIS) business to Philips Healthcare. This includes its radiology and cardiology PACS and reporting software. Image by geralt on Pixabay 

News | Radiology Business | March 07, 2019
Carestream Health has signed an agr
Videos | Orthopedic Imaging | March 05, 2019
This is an example of a 3-D printed pelvis that had multiple hip fractures and a second printed pelvis is from a post