News | May 24, 2012

Radiology Experts Return to Haiti Again to Educate and Equip Local Providers

May 24, 2012 — A team of radiologist physicians, ultrasonographers and radiologic technologists will provide a series of didactic and hands-on medical imaging training sessions for local healthcare providers June 4-5 at Grace Children’s Hospital in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

These “Radiology Education Days,” expected to draw up to 70 healthcare professionals from across Haiti, are part of the American College of Radiology’s (ACR) ongoing response to the vast medical needs resulting from the 2010 earthquake that destroyed much of Haiti’s healthcare infrastructure — including radiology equipment, supplies and teaching materials that support day-to-day care.

“This educational event is another important step toward restoring and strengthening radiologic care in Haiti and saving lives. The ACR and the radiology profession continue to invest time and resources to help rebuild and restore Haitian radiology infrastructure, including the hospital where the event will be held. We are proud to be part of this ongoing effort,” said Paul Ellenbogen, M.D., FACR, chair of the American College of Radiology Board of Chancellors.

The ongoing ACR effort in Haiti is made possible, in part, by the Haiti Radiology Relief Fund, founded in the immediate aftermath of the 2010 earthquake. The Haiti effort is facilitated by the ACR Foundation International Outreach Program, which provides healthcare facilities around the world with radiological support — including equipment, supplies, education materials as well as radiologist, medical physicist and radiologic technologist volunteers.

“The ACR recognizes both the immediate and longer term radiological needs in Haiti and elsewhere. We strongly urge all of those in the radiology community to help us provide an organized effort to help those who desperately need access to the care that we provide. Whatever you can give: your expertise, equipment, education materials or financial backing will be greatly appreciated and will help save and extend lives,” said James P. Borgstede, M.D., chair of the ACR Foundation International Outreach Committee.

This most recent team of radiology experts to return to Haiti includes representatives from the ACR, the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) and the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (SDMS).

For more information: internationalservice.acr.org

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