News | April 02, 2013

Radiologist Assistant Reimbursement Bill Introduced in Congress

The bill aims to amend the Social Security Act to recognize RA State laws and allow Medicare reimbursement

CT Scan

April 2, 2013 — Representatives Dave Reichert (R-WA), Jim Matheson (D-UT), Pete Olson (R-TX) and Bill Pascrell (D-NJ) have introduced the Medicare Access to Radiology Care Act of 2013 (H.R. 1148).

This bill would amend the Social Security Act to recognize radiologist assistants (RAs) as non-physician providers of healthcare services to Medicare beneficiaries, and it would authorize physician reimbursement through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) for procedures performed by RAs in states that have laws establishing radiologist assistant practice guidelines.

RAs work under radiologist supervision and perform select imaging and patient-care duties traditionally performed by the radiologist. While they do not prescribe medication or therapies, diagnose or interpret medical images, RAs perform procedures and patient assessment and management that increase patient access to critical radiology services and augment the delivery of optimal, timely and safe radiology care – leading to greater efficiencies and value for patients and providers.

RAs are educated in an advanced medical imaging academic program specifically designed to complement the work of radiologists. Currently, 12 universities offer accredited education programs with radiologist-supervised clinical training, and 29 states license or certify RAs. Upon graduation from an accredited program, radiologist assistants take a national certification examination developed by The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) or the Certification Board for Radiology Practitioner Assistants (CBRPA). To maintain their national ARRT or CBRPA certification, RAs must maintain certification and registration in radiography, complete approved continuing education every two years and comply with strict professional standards of ethical conduct as administered by ARRT.

The bill would enable healthcare facilities and radiology practices to be reimbursed for RA-performed services. By establishing a reduced reimbursement level for the professional component of procedures performed by RAs, the bill should result in savings to the healthcare system.

“Although not a complete solution to the patient access problems that this country is facing, making this modest change to the Medicare law will enable radiologist assistants to provide care to the full extent of their training and scope of practice, thereby improving patient care and satisfaction, lowering costs and meeting patient demand,” said Jerry B. Reid, Ph.D., executive director with ARRT. “We applaud Rep. Reichert and the other cosponsors who recognize the need to adopt common-sense, bipartisan changes to the Medicare program so that seniors can benefit from innovations in health care delivery.”

For more information: www.arrt.org, www.srpeweb.org

 

Related Content

ClariPi Gets FDA Clearance for AI-powered CT Image Denoising Solution
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 24, 2019
Artificial intelligence (AI) imaging solution form ClariPi Inc. has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...
Third FDA Clearance Announced for Zebra-Med's AI Solution for Brain Bleed Alerts
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | June 19, 2019
Zebra Medical Vision announced it has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for...
Canon Medical Receives FDA Clearance for AiCE Reconstruction Technology for CT
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 18, 2019
Canon Medical Systems USA Inc. has received 510(k) clearance on its new deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) image...
International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines

X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019
An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for...
A static image drawn from a stack of brain MR images may illustrate the results of a study. But a GIF (or MP4 movie), created by the Cinebot plug-in, can scroll through that stack, providing teaching moments for residents and fellows at Georgetown University

A static image drawn from a stack of brain MR images may illustrate the results of a study. But a GIF (or MP4 movie), created by the Cinebot plug-in, can scroll through that stack, providing teaching moments for residents and fellows at Georgetown University. Image courtesy of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

Feature | Information Technology | June 13, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Editor’s note: This article is the third in a content series by Greg Freiherr covering the Society for Imaging In
Aidoc Earns FDA Approval for AI for C-spine Fractures
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | June 11, 2019
Radiology artificial intelligence (AI) provider Aidoc announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared...
SCCT Announces 2019 Gold Medal Award Recipients
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 05, 2019
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) will present the 2019 Gold Medal Award to Jonathon Leipsic, M....
At ACC 2019, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top CT optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate data needed to do  CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve).

At ACC 2019, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top CT optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate data needed to do
CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve).

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | May 31, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
The fingerprints of value-added medicine were all over products and works-in-progress on the exhibit floor of the ann
Einstein Healthcare Network found that use of automated power injectors reduced CT contrast extravasation rates over a 30-month period.

Einstein Healthcare Network found that use of automated power injectors reduced CT contrast extravasation rates over a 30-month period.

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | May 30, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis
As of 2015, approximately 79 million computed tomography (CT) scans were performed each year in the U.S.