News | July 24, 2014

Radiologic Associates of Fredericksburg Introduces Concierge Service for Physicians

Service aims to expedite communication between referring physicians

July 24, 2014 — Radiologic Associates of Fredericksburg (RAF) has launched a concierge service for physicians who refer patients to medical facilities served by RAF. The service makes it easier for referring physicians to track studies and locate the best subspecialist to discuss specific studies and results.

RAF's board-certified, fellowship-trained radiologists and vascular surgeons provide services to Mary Washington Hospital, Stafford Hospital, Medical Imaging of Fredericksburg, Imaging Center for Women, Medical Imaging at Lee's Hill, Medical Imaging of North Stafford and Virginia Interventional & Vascular Associates. 

Physicians who refer patients to these facilities can contact the RAF Concierge from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, at 855-RAF-LINE (855-723-5463) or [email protected]. The concierge can expedite communication between referring physicians in the community and the ideal subspecialized radiologists to coordinate the most beneficial imaging study, review findings and discuss the status of a patient's medical imaging procedure.  

Like most radiologists, RAF physicians rotate among several locations. Unlike most radiology practices, however, RAF also provides 24/7 "in-house" coverage, with the radiologists rotating between daytime, evening, nighttime and weekend hours.  

For more information: rafimaging.com

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