News | September 18, 2007

RADinfo Systems Launches DICOMmail Program

September 19, 2007 – RADinfo recently announced that the company has developed a new software program, DICOMmail, that allows physicians who are seeking consultative opinions regarding medical images to access and share critical and protected images through common email systems.

DICOMmail comes with a free Basic RSVS Viewer and presents a solution for people seeking outside consulting. The program allows a user to send DICOM images through email by dragging and dropping files; converting JPEG, GIF and/or BMP images into DICOM format, if needed and then clicking send. The consulting user can view the images in the Basic RSVS Viewer after an Internet download of the DICOMmail application.

DICOMmail contains two parts. The first part is the free DICOMmail Viewer, which is based on RADinfo Systems FDA-approved RSVS visualization technology. The second part is the DICOMmail Send, which allows the user to drag and drop an image into the software for delivery to any email address. DICOMmail supports DICOM, jpeg, gif and bitmap images.

RADinfo is offering a 60-day free demo of the DICOMmail Send portion of the software until Dec. 31, 2007. This will allow the end-user to experience how DICOMmail can help improve access, as well as share critical and protected images through email by dragging and dropping files.

For more information: www.radinfosystems.com

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