News | PET-MRI | October 13, 2016

Preclinical PET/MRI Scanner Installed at University of Arizona Could Improve Tumor Assessment

Dual-modality approach being developed uses Cubresa’s NuPET PET scanner and a dynamic MRI technique to more fully characterize cancerous tumors

University of Arizona, Cubresa, NuPET, PET/MRI scanner installed, tumor assessment

Panel A shows a flank A549 lung tumor in a nude mouse with combined 18F-FDG PET uptake (signal intensity in color) and T2-weighted anatomical MRI (grayscale). Panel B shows a similar tumor image with a relative permeability map for the tumor (color code) overlaid on a corresponding anatomical MRI reference. Regions identified as necrotic were not included in the DCE MRI analysis. Image courtesy of the University of Arizona Department of Medical Imaging.

October 13, 2016 — Cubresa Inc. recently announced the successful installation of their compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner called NuPET for preclinical PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the Department of Medical Imaging at the University of Arizona (UA).

PET and MRI are complementary imaging methods for better understanding disease and testing novel treatments in small animal subjects.

“The key is taking advantage of the strengths of each technique,” said Julio Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Ph.D., research assistant professor of medical imaging at UA. “Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI shows vascular permeability or the ‘openness’ of tumors for delivery and uptake of nutrients such as glucose, while PET imaging using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET) shows glucose consumption by those cells.”

Areas in a solid tumor that are less permeable should also have low 18F-FDG PET uptake, simply due to less contrast agent being delivered, and not necessarily due to low glucose consumption by the cells. However, areas with high permeability that should also have high tumor uptake, but in fact show low intracellular 18F-FDG PET uptake could be an indication that the tumor is dying. This simultaneous dual-modality approach leverages the functional capability and anatomical accuracy of DCE MRI and the tremendous sensitivity of 18F-FDG PET.

“A single imaging mode is not enough to reveal all the permutations and gain a diagnostically useful understanding of what’s going on inside the tumor,” said Marty Pagel, Ph.D., a UA professor of medical imaging and director of the Contrast Agent Molecular Engineering Laboratory. “But, as we refine our approach, I’m confident that better interpretations will be made, and that could translate into better outcomes for patients.”

For more information: www.cubresa.com

Related Content

Nuclear Cardiology Optimistic About Return to Pre-COVID-19 Exam Levels. An American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) member survey are confident nuclear cardiology volumes will return to pre-pandemic levels. #COVID19 #SARScov2
News | Nuclear Imaging | June 01, 2020
June 1, 2020 — While acknowledging the challenges their specialty is facing, more than two-thirds of respondents to a
The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2020 annual meeting has been reimagined, and is now the SNMMI 2020 Annual Meeting — Virtual Edition
News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 30, 2020
April 30, 2020 — The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2020 annual meeting has been reimagined, and
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2 U.S. Army Spc. Jonathon Hyde and Spc. Casymn Harrison from the 1434th Engineer Company, Grayling, Mich., Michigan National Guard, prepare patient rooms at TCF Regional Care Center in Detroit in advance of receiving COVID-19 patients, April 9, 2020 #COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

U.S. Army Spc. Jonathon Hyde and Spc. Casymn Harrison from the 1434th Engineer Company, Grayling, Mich., Michigan National Guard, prepare patient rooms at TCF Regional Care Center in Detroit in advance of receiving COVID-19 patients, April 9, 2020. The TCF Center in Detroit has been converted into a 970-bed alternative care facility for COVID-19 patients by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, in partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Michigan National Guard. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Scott Thompson)

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 15, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane and Dave Fornell
In an effort to keep the imaging field updated on the latest information being released on coronavirus (COVID-19), th
Maximum-intensity PET projections at each time point for one rhesus monkey in the 89Zr-DFO-squaramide-anti-gD group.

Maximum-intensity PET projections at each time point for one rhesus monkey in the 89Zr-DFO-squaramide-anti-gD group. Image courtesy of Eric Berg, University of California, Davis, CA

News | PET Imaging | April 10, 2020
April 10, 2020 — Combining 89Zr-labeled antibodies with total-body...
Recommended best practices for nuclear imaging departments under the COVIF-19 pandemic have been issues by the ASNC and SNMMI. #COVID19 #ASNC #SNMMI #Coronavirus #SARScov2
News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 03, 2020
April 3, 2020 — A new guidance document on best practices to maintain safety and minimize contamination in nuclear im
 “Cyclotrons used in Nuclear Medicine Report & Directory, Edition 2020” that describes close to 1,500 medical cyclotrons worldwide
News | Nuclear Imaging | March 10, 2020
March 10, 2020 — MEDraysintell released its new and unique report “...
Potassium Molybdate Mo 99 Source Vessels for RadioGenix System

Potassium Molybdate Mo 99 Source Vessels for RadioGenix System (Photo: Business Wire)

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | February 18, 2020
February 18, 2020 — NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes, LLC, a