Technology | November 28, 2009

Platform Combines 3D Viewing, Decision Support

November 29, 2009 - A new advanced visualization and decision support software upgrade is designed to improve management of CT stroke protocols and 3D or 2D viewing. It also provides electronic medical record (EMR) integration.

Version 4.4.5 of iNtuition advanced visualization software by TeraRecon Inc. offers a wide range of new clinical enhancements, image delivery methods and architectural improvements. These include the following:

A feature to manage your CT stroke protocols uses volumetric time-dependent analysis (TDA) speeds management of 320-slice, 160-slice and 128-slice CT examinations performed to study brain perfusion, including automated AquariusAPS pre-processing to minimize wait times and enable prompt interpretation of time-sensitive data.

The new viewer supports 3D or 2D viewing of the image data contained on the disk. Real-time volume rendering is supported including slab MIP, cut-planes and cube views. Embedded software on the CD performs these features running on any ordinary PC with no network connectivity required.

With stand-alone support there is no need for network access when using the alternate software rendering mode.

The new server form-factors allow a fully-featured iNtuition solution to run on a single 1U server in low volume environments. A fully- redundant enterprise-class system capable of supporting many facilities and serving more than 35 fully-featured users is accomplished in just 8U of server rack space.

EMR integration is made easy with no need to load pre-generated URL links into patient reports. Only published studies can be viewed from the EMR, providing a seamless workflow for all patient reports.

The new iNtuition Virtual Client Concentrator enables browser-based access to multiple iNtuition clients at once, requiring only the addition of a single 1U server to your iNtuition installation.

Expanded endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) planning tools include automatic calculation of sac volume and a clock face overlay for making
angular assessments required for fenestrated and branch graft planning.

Accelerated colonography reading now features a broad range of new views, tools and preferences to customize the reading environment, lower learning curves and increase efficiency.

The platform lets the user assess parametric color maps of time-dependent MR studies to rapidly assess tissue kinetics.

This version supports RADLEX terminology lookup with auto-completion of terms, and annotation and image markup (AIM) compliant export of findings for integration with workflow and research databases.

A new surgical planning tool includes clock face and distance to the nipple. BiRADS classification is supported in the reporting module.

The new version also aims to simplify PET/CT image fusion with the “spinning man” tool with auto triangulation of all views, and new image series hanging protocols.

TeraRecon is featuring the solution at the 95th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) at McCormick Place, Chicago.

For more information: www.terarecon.com

Related Content

DrChrono and 3D4Medical Partner to Bring 3-D Interactive Modeling to Physician Practices
News | Advanced Visualization | March 18, 2019
DrChrono Inc. and 3D4Medical have teamed up so practices across the United States can access 3-D interactive modeling...
Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 17, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Virtual reality (VR) and its less immersive kin, augmented reality (AR), are gaining traction in some medical applica
Videos | Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019
This is an example of a new endoscopic virtual peritoneal inflation tool on the patient's computed tomography (CT) im
Videos | Orthopedic Imaging | March 05, 2019
This is an example of a 3-D printed pelvis that had multiple hip fractures and a second printed pelvis is from a post
Videos | Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019
This is an example of a new endoscopic 3-D imaging simulator created from a patient's computed tomography (CT) scan u
Patients and surgeons at Hoag Memorial Hospital are looking at virtual reality reconstructions (right) over conventional 2D images

Slice v 3D: Patients and surgeons at Hoag Memorial Hospital are looking at virtual reality reconstructions (right) over conventional 2D images. Images courtesy of Hoag Memorial Hospital

News | Radiology Imaging | March 04, 2019 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
 
iSchemaView Launches RAPID Angio
Technology | Angiography | March 01, 2019
iSchemaView announced the release of RAPID Angio, a complete neuroimaging solution for the angiography suite that...
Videos | Cardiac Imaging | February 27, 2019
This is a virtual heart with the same electrophysiology characteristics as the real patient unveiled by Siemens at th
Philips and Microsoft have partnered to develop an augmented reality system to help imporve workflow and procedural navigation in the cath lab. Physicians wearing visors can view and interact with true 3-D holograms above the patient on the table and manipulate the image with voice and hand motion commands to avoid breaking the sterile field.

Philips and Microsoft have partnered to develop an augmented reality system to help imporve workflow and procedural navigation in the cath lab. Physicians wearing visors can view and interact with true 3-D holograms above the patient on the table and manipulate the image with voice and hand motion commands to avoid breaking the sterile field. 

News | Advanced Visualization | February 25, 2019
Philips will unveil a new mixed reality concept developed together with Microsoft that the company says is designed for...
MRI and Computer Modeling Reveals How Wrist Bones Move

Using fast MRI, UC Davis researchers scanned left and right wrists of men and women and used the data to build computer models of the movement of wrist bones. The data could help understand wrist injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome. Image courtesy of Brent Foster and Abhijit Chaudhari, UC Davis.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 19, 2019
In a just-published Journal of Biomechanics article, the researchers proved a longtime assumption about individuals'...