News | Medical 3-D Printing | March 04, 2016

Planmeca ProModel Part of First Nordic Facial Tissue Transplant Procedure

Pre-operative modeling from CT images reduces total procedure time by hours

Planmeca ProModel, 3-D printing, first Nordic facial tissue transplant procedure

Image courtesy of Planmeca

March 4, 2016 — The first facial tissue transplant procedure in the history of the Nordic countries was performed earlier this year in the Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa (HUS) in Finland. Planmeca contributed to the demanding and rare operation, which was the 35th of its kind in the world to date.

The facial tissue transplant surgery itself took 21 hours and was carried out by a group of 11 surgeons, as well as 20 nurses and other experts. The operation consisted of transplanting the patient’s upper and lower jaw, lips and nose, as well as segments of their skin, midfacial and tongue muscles, and the nerves of these muscles. The head the surgical team, Patrik Lassus, M.D., emphasized that the objective of the operation was to transplant facial functions, not external features.

The Planmeca ProModel service was part of the demanding procedure. It is a service for designing and creating patient-specific implants, surgical guides and skull models from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)/CT images. 3-D technology decreases surgical time and produces significantly more precise results when compared to traditional methods. This makes operations increasingly safer for patients.

The facial tissue transplant procedure was planned pre-operatively utilizing 3-D technology. The planning consisted of modeling donor tissues and determining how they match the recipient. Surgeons Lassus and Jyrki Törnwall, M.D., designed the 3-D-printed surgical guides together with Planmeca’s CAD/CAM designer.

Planmeca’s software substantially decreased the operating time – saving hours compared to similar procedures previously carried out elsewhere in the world. Conserving time is one of the key aspects of surgery, as longer operations increase the risk of complications. In transplant cases, it is also of paramount importance to accelerate the restoration of blood flow.

“Based on literature, we know that it can take 3 to 4 hours to trim bones. In this particular operation, it took Patrik [Lassus] and myself under 10 minutes to place the transplant. This led to a drastic reduction in the duration of the surgery, while also significantly improving the accuracy of bone placement,” described Törnwall in the press conference on the operation.

Planmeca participated in planning the facial tissue transplant right from the start, led by CAD/CAM Design Manager Jani Horelli.

At Planmeca, planning the operation began around three years ago. Careful steps were taken in preparing for the upcoming procedure.

“Planmeca’s part consisted of two phases. First, we designed the surgical guides together with Dr. Lassus and Dr. Törnwall, as well as determined the kinds of segments that would be surgically removed from the recipient and transplanted from the donor. At this point, we were anticipating a scenario, which would become concrete once a donor was found,” recounted Horelli. “The second phase began immediately once we received word of a suitable donor. An X-ray image of the donor was taken at the hospital and the imaging data was utilized in 3-D designing. We also simulated the operation together with the surgeons. Following this, the components were designed and manufactured at Planmeca headquarters and transported to the hospital, where they were taken directly to the operating room.”

“Planmeca’s role has been essential to our work for years – we have been able to utilize computer simulations to create saw guides, which allow us to saw at a specific orientation and to an exact depth, as well as remove facial structures, which we know match the donor, at a precise angle,” Törnwall noted.

For more information: www.planmeca.com

Related Content

Two examples of CT myocardial perfusion (CTP) imaging assessment software. Canon is on the left and GE Healthcare is on the right. Both of these technologies have been around for a few years, but there have been an increasing amount of clinical data from studies showing the accuracy of the technology compared to nuclear imaging, the current stand of care for myocardial perfusion imaging, and cardiac MRI. #SCCT #perfusionimaging 

Two examples of CT myocardial perfusion (CTP) imaging assessment software. Canon is on the left and GE Healthcare is on the right. Both of these technologies have been around for a few years, but there have been an increasing amount of clinical data from studies showing the accuracy of the technology compared to nuclear imaging, the current stand of care for myocardial perfusion imaging, and cardiac MRI.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 16, 2020
March 16, 2020 — The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) released a new...
Carestream’s X-ray digital tomosynthesis functionality creates three-dimensional datasets from digital radiography (DR) that can be scrolled through similar to computed tomography (CT) imaging. It received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in January 2020. Digital tomosynthesis uses a single sweep of X-ray exposures and streamlines operator workflow by separating the process of DT exposure acquisition from image volume formation.
News | Digital Radiography (DR) | January 15, 2020
January 15, 2020 — Carestream’s X-ray digital tomosynthesis (DT) functionality, which creates three-dimensional datas
Videos | RSNA | January 13, 2020
ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most innovative new medical imaging technologies displayed on the
Videos | Advanced Visualization | December 30, 2019
This is a hologram of a fracture from a...
Videos | RSNA | December 18, 2019
ITN Editor Dave Fornell and ITN Consulting Editor Greg Freiherr offer a post-game report on the trends and technologi
 CAE Healthcare will showcase its mixed reality training solutions for practicing physicians and medical imaging companies for the first time at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 meeting. With technology platforms that integrate modeled human physiology into immersive, augmented reality environments, CAE Healthcare partners with vendors to deliver risk-free training solutions that meet the needs of physicians and equipment providers. #RSNA19 #RSNA2019
News | Virtual and Augmented Reality | November 27, 2019
November 27, 2019 — CAE Healthcare will showcase its mixed reality training solutions for practicing physicians and m
LungPrint Discovery offers fully automatic radiological metrics and unique, time-saving airway visualizations
News | Advanced Visualization | October 29, 2019
October 29, 2019 — VIDA Diagnostics, Inc.