News | September 28, 2008

Philips Uses Ultrasound-Activated Microbubbles for Cancer Treatments

September 29, 2008 - Philips is developing a system that uses ultrasound-activated microbubbles for chemotherapy drug delivery designed to increase the effectiveness and reduce the side effects.

The system proposes the use of drug-loaded microbubbles, no larger than red blood cells, which can be injected into the patient’s bloodstream, tracked via ultrasound imaging and then ruptured by a focused ultrasound pulse to release their drug payload when they reach the desired spot. Because the drugs would only be released at the site of the diseased tissue, the patient’s total body exposure to them could be limited. For certain types of treatment – for example, chemotherapy for breast cancer – this could help to reduce unpleasant side effects.

The use of microbubbles in conjunction with medical ultrasound imaging is not new. However, at the moment in clinical practice, microbubbles are only used as contrast agents for example to highlight blood in the ultrasound images – an application that relies on the fact that microbubbles reflect ultrasound much better than blood or soft tissue.

The drug delivery technology being developed by scientists at Philips Research continues to utilize the contrast-enhancing capabilities of microbubbles to help ultrasound operators to locate tumors – based on their density and the fact that tumors typically grow a recognizable network of small blood vessels around themselves. What’s new is that it then shatters the shells of the microbubbles in these blood vessels using a focused high-energy ultrasound pulse. As a result, the drugs contained in the microbubbles are released directly inside the tumor.

Philips is working with several academic partners, including the University of Virginia (USA) and the University of Muenster (Germany), to refine the technology. Clinical institutions, such as The Methodist Hospital in Houston (USA), are also actively researching this new and exciting field of ultrasound mediated drug delivery.

“More and more, patients are demanding treatment options that allow them to maintain their quality of life during the treatment regime, without sacrificing treatment efficacy,” comments King Li, MD, chair of the Department of Radiology at the Methodist Hospital in Houston (USA) and professor of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College (USA). ”The non-invasive nature of ultrasound mediated delivery is a step in this direction. Work at our and other institutions using ultrasound for drug delivery and treatment guidance has shown the potential of this technology in pre-clinical studies.”

For more information: www.medical.philips.com

Related Content

Hitachi Medical Systems Europe Named Imaging Supplier for London Prostate Cancer Program
News | Prostate Cancer | June 14, 2018
Hitachi Medical Systems Europe has been awarded the contract to supply six ultrasound systems as part of the RAPID...
How AI and Deep Learning Will Enable Cancer Diagnosis Via Ultrasound

The red outline shows the manually segmented boundary of a carcinoma, while the deep learning-predicted boundaries are shown in blue, green and cyan. Copyright 2018 Kumar et al. under Creative Commons Attribution License.

News | Ultrasound Imaging | June 12, 2018 | Tony Kontzer
June 12, 2018 — Viksit Kumar didn’t know his mother had...
Olympus and Hitachi Healthcare Americas Introduce Arietta 850
News | Ultrasound Imaging | June 04, 2018
Olympus, a global technology leader in designing and delivering innovative solutions for medical and surgical procedu
New Ultrasound Guidelines Reliably Identify Children Who Should be Biopsied for Thyroid Cancer

Image courtesy of Loyola Medicine

News | Pediatric Imaging | May 29, 2018
A Loyola Medicine study has found that new ultrasound guidelines can reliably identify pediatric patients who should be...
Samsung Receives FDA Clearance for Premium Ultrasound System RS85
Technology | Ultrasound Imaging | May 07, 2018
NeuroLogica, a subsidiary of Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., announced the Samsung RS85 ultrasound system has received U....
3D-4D ultrasound of a fetus imaged with a GE Volusion E10 system. It shows the yoke sac. This is a baby ultrasound, also referred to as fetal ultrasound or prenatal ultrasound.

3D-4D ultrasound of a fetus imaged with a GE Volusion E10 system. It shows the yoke sac.

Feature | Ultrasound Women's Health | May 07, 2018
Below is a collection of prenatal ultrasound images from the ITN archive.
Esaote Change of Ownership Completed
News | Ultrasound Imaging | April 30, 2018
The acquisition of biomedical equipment company Esaote SpA’s share capital was completed on April 19, the company...
360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | April 26, 2018
Here is a 360 view inside one of the ultrasound imaging rooms at Northwestern Medicine's Central DuPage Hospital in t
2018 Set to be Strong for the Global Ultrasound Market
Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | April 18, 2018 | Simon Harris
After a year of mixed fortunes, the global ultrasound market is set for a strong year in 2018.
Philips Integrates Reacts Tele-Ultrasound Platform on Lumify Portable Systems

Image courtesy of Philips Healthcare

News | Ultrasound Imaging | March 30, 2018
Philips in partnership with Innovative Imaging Technologies (IIT) announced an industry-first integrated tele-...
Overlay Init