News | December 17, 2010

Philips - SpeechMike Line Has Improved Technology, Ergonomics

The SpeechMike product line of dictation microphones is designed for ease of use and to give the user control from the palm of the hand. SpeechMike offers good audio quality for accurate speech recognition results, plus a comfortable ergonomic design.

The device features intuitive navigation tools, including playback speakers, dictation control and PC navigation in a single device. Additionally, users can send sound files for transcription at the press of a button, and network-based file transfer creates unparalleled data protection. In conjunction with the professional SpeechExec software solutions, desktop dictation is easier than ever.

Among new features in the SpeechMike product range, the housing of the new SpeechMike III is made of antimicrobial material, which works against micro-organisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi and algae. This new material practically eliminates micro-organisms from any object and improves hygiene for an added feeling of cleanliness.

The SpeechMike Air is a wireless PC microphone that offers several benefits, including: one-thumb operation of all dictation features; intuitive recording with push-to-talk function; high-quality microphone; recording quality optimized for speech recognition; clearly visible LEDs that indicate record, insert and overwrite mode, and hree function buttons for individual configuration.

Philips Speech Processing also provides a software development kit available to integration partners for integration with other applications. New features and tools make integration easier, including a 60-second testing tool, sample applications, reference sound samples and an advanced configuration utility.

For more information: www.philips.com/dictation

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