News | Clinical Decision Support | June 16, 2020

Philips and MD Anderson Collaborate to Provide Oncologists with Evidence-based Therapy, Clinical Trial Guidance

Philips connects oncologists and pathologists around the world to MD Anderson’s Precision Oncology Decision Support (PODS) system of actionable clinical information

Philips connects oncologists and pathologists around the world to MD Anderson’s Precision Oncology Decision Support (PODS) system of actionable clinical information

Image courtesy of Philips

June 16, 2020 — Philips and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center announced a collaboration to provide oncologists with evidence-based therapy and clinical trial guidance through Philips’ oncology informatics solutions and MD Anderson’s Precision Oncology Decision Support (PODS) system. This collaboration will allow physicians around the world to personalize therapy based on the patient’s genomic profile, with the aim of improving patient care.

MD Anderson developed the PODS system as an evidence-based tool to facilitate therapeutic decision-making at the point of care. The system provides actionable clinical information, including approved therapies and available clinical trials, based upon genetic alterations within the tumor. Through the Philips solutions, clinicians receive a unified view of therapies and clinical trials in the context of their patient’s unique tumor, helping them make an evidence-based decision for their patient’s treatment.

“We developed PODS to enable physicians to better understand and act on genetic variations within each patient’s tumor, making it easier to provide the best treatments possible,” said Funda Meric-Bernstam, M.D., chair of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics at MD Anderson. “Through our collaboration with Philips, we hope to share our clinical experience with physicians around the world and contribute to improving care for patients globally.”

Today, pathologists and oncologists are faced with the challenges of keeping abreast of the increasing number of therapy options and the rapid advances in genomic testing, the molecular findings of which require increasingly specialized expertise to interpret. The growing amount of evidence for newly approved targeted and immune-oncology therapies necessitates solutions to simplify the complexity. Philips and MD Anderson aim to help pathologists and oncologists serve their patients and provide them with therapeutic options and relevant clinical trials based on tumor markers.

“Driven by the latest therapy breakthroughs, a deeper understanding of cancer biology and an increasing number of clinical trials, oncology practices can provide more options than ever for many patients,” said Louis Culot, General Manager of Oncology Informatics at Philips. “Broadening our long-standing collaboration with MD Anderson, Precision Oncology Decision Support becomes available to physicians through the Philips oncology informatics solution, providing the latest actionable information that supports their confident clinical decision-making.“

For more information: www.philips.com

 

Related Content

World's largest radiation oncology meeting will offer full conference on interactive platform October 25-28, 2020
News | ASTRO | July 09, 2020
July 9, 2020 — Registration opens today for the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (...
Simulation finds starting at age 30 with MRI and mammography to be the preferred strategy; starting at 25 prevented marginally more deaths, but with more testing and emotional stress

Getty Images

News | Breast Imaging | July 09, 2020
July 9, 2020 — Chest radiation is used to treat children with Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma as well as lung metast
At the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting, new artificial intelligence (AI) software to assist with radiotherapy treatment planning systems was highlighted. The goal of the AI-based systems is to save staff time, while still allowing clinicians to do the final patient review. 
Feature | Treatment Planning | July 08, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
At the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 201
 Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain unresponsive after surviving critical illness. Investigators led by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) now describe a patient with severe COVID-19 who, despite prolonged unresponsiveness and structural brain abnormalities, demonstrated functionally intact brain connections and weeks later he recovered the ability to follow commands

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (...
Changes outlined in new draft U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) lung cancer screening recommendations will greatly increase the number of Americans eligible for screening and help medical providers save thousands more lives each year.

Image courtesy of Cerner

News | Lung Imaging | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Changes outlined in new draft U.S.
Radiotherapy has been used to treat cancers for more than a century and continues to be utilized in cancer treatment plans today. Since the introduction of radiotherapy, clinicians have been working tirelessly to further refine treatments to better target cancer.
Feature | Radiation Therapy | July 06, 2020 | By Yves Archambault
Everything has room for improvement, right? Right. When it comes to cancer care, it is no different.
Proton therapy has evolved, and future predictions include smaller systems, more sophisticated proton dosimetry and devices that manipulate the proton beam
Feature | Proton Therapy | July 06, 2020 | By Minesh Mehta, M.D.
The field of proton...
Researchers reviewed results of prostate biopsies on over 3,400 men who had targets identified on prostate MRI and found that the positive predictive value of the test for prostate cancer was highly variable at different sites
News | Prostate Cancer | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — Prostate MRI is an emerging technology used to identify and guide treatment for...
R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — Researchers using magnetic...