News | PET-CT | June 20, 2016

PET/CT Imaging of Prostate Cancer Proves Accurate Biopsy Guide

Study shows imaging of prostate-specific membrane antigen leads to highly accurate tumor detection and delineation

prostate cancer, biopsy, PET-CT, Ga-68 PSMA, SNMMI 2016 study, Wolfgang Fendler

June 20, 2016 — Prostate cancer is the leading cancer among men, second only to skin cancer. With surgical removal at the frontline of defense, oncologists are considering prostate-specific molecular imaging at the point of initial biopsy and pre-operative planning to root out the full extent of disease, researchers revealed at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).

Positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) are often used in conjunction to image both the physiological function and structure of recurrent prostate cancer. In recent years, scientists have been developing a PET imaging agent that targets a protein called prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). This protein is over-expressed on the surface of prostate cancer cells and can be detected even after they have spread to other organs. Researchers are able to detect prostate cancer by combining a small amount of radioactive material called gallium-68 and the molecular compound PSMA-HBED-CC (collectively known as Ga-68 PSMA), which is then injected prior to PET/CT scanning. Once administered, the agent binds to cells expressing PSMA and emits a signal detected by the scanner.

Scan images of the tumor data show active tumors glowing like hot coals where they are most virulent. While PSMA PET/CT is not yet the standard of image guidance for biopsies and surgical resection, the findings of this study show that this molecular imaging technique stands to improve tumor staging from the start.

“PSMA shows significant over-expression on prostatic cancer cells and Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT demonstrates a high rate of detection in patients with recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer. However much less research has been conducted for the accuracy of PSMA imaging at the start of the disease,” said Wolfgang P. Fendler, M.D., from the department of nuclear medicine at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität of Munich in Munich, Germany. “The results of our study indicate that Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT accurately identifies affected regions of the prostate and might thus present a promising tool for non-invasive tumor characterization and biopsy guidance.”

Researchers evaluated subjects with histopathology and maximum standard uptake values using Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT to determine the boundaries of prostate tumor burden in the days prior to surgical resection. Results showed that the 67 percent of segmented tissues that tested positive for cancer via histological evaluation were positively identified by PET/CT via Ga-68 PSMA tumor uptake. With further investigation and regulatory approval, oncologists could one day use prostate-specific molecular imaging to aid needle biopsy and primary staging for better prostate-cancer patient care.

Approximately one out of seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer within their lifetime. About 180,890 new cases and 26,120 deaths from prostate cancer are estimated to occur in the U.S. alone in 2016, according to the American Cancer Society.

For more information: www.snmmi.org

Related Content

The FLASH Effect significantly improves the therapeutic ratio for curing cancer

The FLASH Effect significantly improves the therapeutic ratio for curing cancer

News | Radiation Oncology | July 28, 2021
July 28, 2021 — IntraOp Medical Corporation announced that ...
Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 107th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting, the world’s largest annual radiology forum, to be held at McCormick Place Chicago, Nov. 28 – Dec. 2, 2021

Getty Images

News | RSNA | July 21, 2021
July 21, 2021 — Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (...
Artificial intelligence-powered diagnostic tool spots asymptomatic prostate cancer in seconds

(L-R) Associate Professor Peter Brotchie (St Vincent's), Dr Ruwan Tennakoon (RMIT), Professor John Thangarajah (RMIT), Dr Mark Page (St Vincent's). Image courtesy of St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne

News | Prostate Cancer | July 19, 2021
July 19, 2021 — Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed

Positrigo founders Max Ahnen, Ph.D. (left) and Jannis Fischer, Ph.D.

News | PET Imaging | July 16, 2021
Most countries have not introduced nationwide prostate cancer screening, as current methods result in overdiagnoses and excessive and unnecessary biopsies. A new study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, which is published in The New England Journal of Medicine, indicates that screening by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and targeted biopsies could potentially cut overdiagnoses by half.

Getty Images

News | Prostate Cancer | July 12, 2021
July 12, 2021 — Most countries have not introduced nationwide...
A performance evaluation of the uEXPLORER total-body PET/CT scanner showed that it exhibits ultra-high sensitivity that supports excellent spatial resolution and image quality. Given the long axial field of view (AFOV) of the uEXPLORER, study authors have proposed new, extended measurements for phantoms to characterize total-body PET imaging more appropriately. This research was published in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Human imaging examples of performance of uEXPLORER total-body PET scanner. (A) Axial slice from 18F-fluciclovine PET image (right), with corresponding fused image (middle) and CT image (left), of 68-y-old patient with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer, demonstrating clear visualization of 18F-flucicovine accumulation within 2.5-mm-diameter pulmonary nodule. (B) Maximum-intensity projection of representative clinical oncology 18F-FDG PET scan reconstructed with 20-, 5-, and 2.5-min durations, of 59-y-old patient with lung cancer. Images show primary tumor in left lower lobe of lung (dashed circle), with multiple variable-sized (0.8-6 cm) hilar, mediastinal, and lower esophageal nodal metastases (arrows) and ~1-cm 18FFDG-avid left adrenal nodule (arrowhead), which is visualized for all scan durations. Image created by Y. Abdelhafez and B.A. Spencer, EXPLORER Molecular Imaging Center, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA

News | PET Imaging | July 10, 2021
July 10, 2021 — A performance evaluation of the uEXPLORER total-body PET/CT scanner showed that it exhibits ultra-hig
American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) to host in-person Annual Meeting in Chicago, October 24-27

Getty Images

News | ASTRO | July 08, 2021
July 8, 2021 — Registration opens today for the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (...
Aduhelm should be initiated in patients with mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease or mild Alzheimer’s dementia

Getty Images

News | PET Imaging | July 08, 2021
July 8, 2021 — Biogen and...