News | Enterprise Imaging | November 12, 2019

PaxeraHealth to Showcase AI-Based Enterprise Imaging at RSNA 2019

Previously offered as an additional module, PaxeraUltima360 has been redesigned with AI at its core

 Paxera Ultima 360

November 12, 2019 — Medical Imaging developer PaxeraHealth will showcase the latest version of its AI-based enterprise imaging platform — PaxeraUltima360 — at the upcoming RSNA meeting in Chicago.

Previously offered as an additional module, the enterprise platform has been redesigned with AI at its core and now uses the latest machine learning technologies to monitor users' behavioral patterns, adjust to users' preferences and provide clinical decision support with augmented reading aids and responses with improvements backed up by real data. This robust solution's advanced AI chatbot - Erabot - allows users to interact seamlessly with the platform to retrieve patient-specific insights seamlessly from the EMR or CarePassport PHR and speed up actionable information, empowering users to quickly and confidently make decisions about patients' healthcare and benefit from more efficient workflows.

According to the company, the AI running at the core of the Enterprise Imaging solution will help decrease workloads by performing tedious tasks, streamlining access to patient data at relevant and meaningful points of care and improving care coordination.

For more information: www.paxerahealth.com

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