News | Ultrasound Imaging | August 04, 2017

Oregon Tech Partners with Mindray for High-Tech Ultrasound Education

School will begin training students in its four-year ultrasound degree program on 25 new DC-8 Exp systems in fall 2017

Oregon Tech Partners with Mindray for High-Tech Ultrasound Education

August 4, 2017 — To better prepare its ultrasound students to compete and thrive in the evolving healthcare environment, Oregon Institute of Technology (Oregon Tech) partnered with Mindray North America to update department and education capabilities with 25 new Mindray DC-8 Exp high-performance ultrasound systems.

As one of the few institutions in the country to offer a four-year ultrasound degree program, Oregon Tech requires excellent performance and reliability from the systems used to train students. The polytechnic institution has a reputation for its commitment to provide high-quality learning experiences using the newest high-tech ultrasound systems. While many schools use second-hand systems, the partnership with Mindray allows Oregon Tech to achieve its educational goals by providing equipment that matches what is found in the best healthcare settings.

“All ultrasound systems have automated imaging functions,” said Debbie McCollam, professor and Medical Imaging Technology department chair at Oregon Tech. “But we teach students to effectively use manual controls so they develop an intuitive understanding of ultrasound. This process, combined with the excellent image quality of the Mindray systems, allows students to learn how to acquire the highest quality ultrasound techniques and skills.”

In addition to comprehensive clinical application sets on which students are trained, the Mindray systems feature excellent ergonomics and intuitive control panels that match well with the Oregon Tech teaching and learning philosophy.

Oregon Tech’s partnership with Mindray extends beyond the installation of equipment to ongoing service and applications support to assure the long-term success of the cardiovascular and other ultrasound programs. The new machines are being installed in July, with students beginning practice on them in the fall.

For more information: www.mindray.com

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