News | December 12, 2008

Oncologists to Add Molecularly Targeted Therapies to Chemo-Radiotherapy for NSCLC

December 12, 2008 - Currently, combinations of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are the standard treatment approach for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, and concomitant chemo-radiotherapy, although associated with increased acute toxicity, has demonstrated to be the better strategy over sequential chemo-radiotherapy, and it is to be considered a standard approach in patients with good performance status (0–1).

However, the approach to locally advanced NSCLC and to chemo-radiotherapy regimens remains heterogeneous among oncologists, and clinical outcomes are yet disappointing. Thus, the search of new strategies is mandatory.

The main fields of research aiming at improving the survival of locally advanced NSCLC patients are: the addition of further combination chemotherapy as induction or consolidation to concurrent chemo-radiotherapy, and the integration of molecularly targeted therapies into conventional chemo-radiotherapy regimens.

Source: Critical Reviews in Oncology / Hematology. 2008 Dec 1;68(3):222-232, C Guida, P Maione, A Rossi, M Bareschino, C Schettino, D Barzaghi, M Elmo, C Gridelli

For more information: www.croh-online.com

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