News | Information Technology | July 28, 2017

Nuance Restores Service to Majority of eScription Clients Following Malware Incident

Company announced that 75 percent of clients are back online after worldwide NotPetya malware incident

Nuance Restores Service to Majority of eScription Clients Following Malware Incident

July 28, 2017 — Nuance Communications Inc. provided an update on its restoration process following the previously reported June 27, 2017, global NotPetya malware incident that affected many companies in a wide range of industries around the world.

As of today, Nuance Healthcare has brought back on-line the majority of its client base for its flagship eScription LH platform, restoring 75 percent of clients, which account for approximately 90 percent of the total annualized volume of lines that are transcribed on that platform. The transcription platform is used by medical professionals for clinical documentation.

"This was a challenging situation, but Nuance has been a great partner throughout," said Tim Thompson, chief information officer and senior vice president of BayCare Health System, Clearwater, Fla. "We appreciated their efforts to keep us informed about their progress and they worked with us to give us the confidence we needed in their security infrastructure. We are now fully functional and all of our doctors are back to dictating."

"Nuance has been working 24/7 to restore, communicate and enhance their security infrastructure to return us to full functionality so that we can continue to serve our patients. They have made themselves available to talk with customers day and night. That's exemplary of why we have been such a loyal Nuance customer for 15 years," stated Debra Harris, director of health information management and clinical documentation improvement at Salem Health, Salem, Ore.

In addition to the progress made in restoring service on the eScription LH platform, the entire client base of the eScription RH and Clinic 360 solutions that reside on the cloud-based Emdat platform have had service fully restored since July 3. All clients of Nuance's Critical Test Results Management application, which is part of the radiology workflow, were reactivated on July 16. Nuance is providing cloud-based options for a sub-set of the client base that were on older iChart and BeyondText transcription platforms. No Nuance customer data has been altered, lost or removed by the malware.

Use of Nuance's Dragon Medical One dictation system product has increased among clients seeking an alternative for physicians to capture patient documentation. The PowerScribe and Dragon Medical One solutions were not impacted by the June 27 incident and have remained available to customers.

Read the article "Healthcare’s 2015 Data Breaches"

For more information: www.nuance.com

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