News | September 20, 2010

Next-Generation Ultrasound Imaging to Consume Less Power

Next-Generation Ultrasound Imaging to Consume Less Power

Siemens Accuson S2000

September 20, 2010 – A wide-ranging strategic alliance has been formed to advance ultrasound technology, creating ultrasound imaging systems that produce enhanced image quality and advanced 3-D/4-D imaging capabilities, while consuming less power.

The alliance between Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc. and National Semiconductor Corporation brings together Siemens’ leadership in ultrasound technology with National’s energy-efficient analog semiconductor capabilities. National will provide leading-edge power management, signal path and transducer solutions while working closely with Siemens. Based on the companies’ collaboration, Siemens’ ultrasound systems will be able to provide next-generation imaging quality and ground-breaking new applications while at the same time, be more energy efficient. Working together, the end goal is to provide medical ultrasound systems that change the game in workflow efficiency, diagnostic reliability and ease of scanning.

Related Content

According to the CDC, if you are fully vaccinated you can start doing many things that you had stopped doing because of the pandemic. Infographic courtesy of the CDC.

According to the CDC, if you are fully vaccinated you can start doing many things that you had stopped doing because of the pandemic. Infographic courtesy of the CDC.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 13, 2021
May 13, 2021 — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) just
Estimates of excess deaths, defined as the number of persons who have died from all causes, above the expected number of deaths for a given place and time, can provide a comprehensive account of mortality likely related to the COVID-19 pandemic, including deaths that are both directly and indirectly associated with COVID-19.
News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 13, 2021
May 13, 2021 — Estimates of excess deaths, defined as the number of persons who have died from all causes, above the
Medical researchers at Flinders University have established a new link between high body mass index (BMI) and breast cancer survival rates — with clinical data revealing worse outcomes for early breast cancer (EBC) patients and improved survival rates in advanced breast cancer (ABC).

Getty Images

News | Women's Health | May 13, 2021
May 13, 2021 — Medical researchers at Flinders University
News | Artificial Intelligence | May 11, 2021
May 11, 2021 — Whiterabbit, an AI technology company focused on early...