News | Stroke | June 11, 2018

NewYork-Presbyterian Expands Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit Fleet

Hospital becomes first in the nation to operate three Mobile Stroke Treatment Units

NewYork-Presbyterian Expands Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit Fleet

Image courtesy of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

June 11, 2018 — NewYork-Presbyterian, in collaboration with Weill Cornell Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center and the Fire Department of New York (FDNY), is expanding its fleet of Mobile Stroke Treatment Units (MSTU) to Queens and Brooklyn. Thanks to a generous donation by the W.P. Carey Foundation, this makes NewYork-Presbyterian the first health system in the country to operate three of these advanced units.

The MSTU is an emergency vehicle equipped to provide immediate, specialized care to patients who may be experiencing a stroke. The unit uses advanced telemedicine technology, allowing neurologists from NewYork-Presbyterian’s hospital locations to be consulted remotely and at a moment’s notice.

“We are extremely grateful to our donors for their support in helping us provide life-saving stroke treatment with significantly reduced treatment times to the communities of Queens and Brooklyn,” said Steven J. Corwin, M.D., president and CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian. “NewYork-Presbyterian is proud to be a leader in advanced stroke care by becoming the first to operate three Mobile Stroke Treatment Units.”

Every year, approximately 795,000 people in the United States suffer from a blockage in an artery of the brain, depriving it of blood flow and oxygen, which, over the course of minutes, can lead to disability or death. Stroke is one of the most widespread and debilitating conditions and a leading cause of serious long-term disability in the United States.

On April 30, the New York City 911 System via the FDNY began deploying a unit in the community surrounding NewYork-Presbyterian Queens, an ACS Level 1 Trauma Center and certified Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission and by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH). Beginning May 28, it deployed a unit in the community surrounding NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, an ACS Level 2 Trauma Center and certified NYSDOH Stroke Center.

NewYork-Presbyterian launched the city’s first MSTU – and the first of its kind on the East Coast – in October 2016.

“Response time is a critical factor in stroke recovery and the Mobile Stroke Treatment Units now have the capacity to help even more patients,” said Matthew E. Fink, M.D., who oversees the MSTU program and is neurologist-in-chief at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, and chairman of the Department of Neurology and the Louis and Gertrude Feil Professor in Clinical Neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine. “We are bringing the emergency room directly to a patient suffering a stroke. This is a game changer in advanced stroke care.”

“The FDNY is proud to once again partner with NewYork-Presbyterian to integrate two new Mobile Stroke Treatment Units into the 911 system for rapid treatment of patients suffering a stroke,” said Fire Commissioner Daniel A. Nigro. “Our FDNY paramedics, EMTs and firefighters will work closely with these units to continue critical pre-hospital care, potentially saving many more lives.”

Each MSTU is staffed by a highly specialized team of two NYP paramedics, a computed tomography (CT) technologist and a registered nurse. A neurologist is consulted remotely via videoconferencing, an advancement that allows the physician to speak with and view the patient and provide an assessment and recommendations for care. It is designed to significantly reduce the time from the onset of symptoms to the delivery of care, a crucial factor in improving stroke outcomes.

The unit also contains equipment and medications specific to diagnosing and treating strokes, including a medication called tPA, which dissolves the clot and improves blood flow to the part of the brain being deprived of blood in the event of an ischemic stroke. The MSTU also has a portable CT scanner that can image the patient’s brain instantly to detect if the patient is having a stroke. The CT scan is then wirelessly transmitted to a NewYork-Presbyterian neuroradiologist to be promptly evaluated.

Take a look at a 360 degree view of the inside of the mobile stroke unit at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital in Winfield, Ill.

During its first year of service, from October 2016 through October 2017, the Manhattan MSTU was deployed 454 times, transported 88 patients and administered tPA 34 times. Since the launch, the MSTU has been able to treat stroke victims approximately 40 minutes faster than a standard ambulance transport.

Once a patient is admitted to the hospital, the MSTU team works to gather pertinent data, including the patient’s outcome after 90 days, the percentage of patients treated by the MSTU who made a full recovery compared with those delivered by standard Emergency Medical Services transport, as well as overall cost of care. A larger analysis is currently in progress that will share information from similar units across the United States in order to understand and provide best treatment practices for emergency stroke care.

Watch a video about the NYP MSTU 

For more information: www.nyp.org/mstu

Related Mobile Stroke Content

VIDEO: Creating and Operating a Mobile Stroke Unit

Northwestern Medicine Mobile Stroke Unit Delivers Life-Saving Care 30 Minutes Sooner

Related Content

An example of a CT coronary artery calcium scoring exam showing how each vessel segment is scored to assess a patient's risk for a future heart attack. Example is from Canon Medical Systems.

An example of a CT coronary artery calcium scoring exam showing how each vessel segment is scored to assess a patient's risk for a future heart attack. Example is from Canon Medical Systems.

News | Cardiac Imaging | September 25, 2020
September 25, 2020 — A study out of University Hospitals (UH) found that removing the cost barrier for coronary arter
New research from King's College London has found that COVID-19 may be diagnosed on the same emergency scans intended to diagnose stroke.

Canon Medical Systems

News | Cardiac Imaging | September 22, 2020
September 22, 2020 — New research from King's College London has
Philips Azurion Lung Edition supports high precision diagnosis and minimally invasive therapy in one room
News | Lung Imaging | September 21, 2020
September 21, 2020 — Philips introduced...
Figure 1. Doppler flows in subpleural consolidation shows smoothly dilated branching arteries

Figure 1. Doppler flows in subpleural consolidation shows smoothly dilated branching arteries 

Feature | Radiology Imaging | September 17, 2020 | By Robert Bard, M.D. PC, DABR, FASLM
COVID-19 is routinely studied using...
Through computed tomography (CT) imaging, WVU geologist James Lamsdell led a team that found evidence of air breathing in a 340 million-year-old sea scorpion, or eurypterid. This is one of the scans of the specimen

Through computed tomography (CT) imaging, WVU geologist James Lamsdell led a team that found evidence of air breathing in a 340 million-year-old sea scorpion, or eurypterid. This is one of the scans of the specimen. Image courtesy of James Lamsdell

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | September 11, 2020
September 11, 2020 — Scientists have long debated the respiratory workings of sea scorpions, but a new discovery by a
The solution leverages image transfer speed, tag morphing, and multi-vendor PACS capabilities to enable comprehensive image visualization and analysis at the point of care
News | Breast Imaging | September 03, 2020
September 3, 2020 — Based on its recent analysis of the global breast imaging workstation industry, Frost & Sulli
Philips announced its next-generation Philips Azurion image-guided therapy platform, marking an important step forward in optimizing clinical and operational lab performance and expanding the role of image-guided interventions in the treatment of patients.
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | September 01, 2020
September 1, 2020 — Philips announced its next-generation ...