Technology | November 26, 2013

New Version of syngo.via Brings Anatomical Intelligence to Diagnostic Reading

Software understands human anatomy; aids diagnostic confidence, efficiency

syngo.via General Engine is a new package of highly automated and standardized applications. Depicted here is the feature Anatomical Range Presets, which displays a quick, precise, optimal view of selected anatomical regions.

November 26, 2013 — Siemens Healthcare will introduce version VA30 of its routine 3-D and advanced reading software syngo.via at the Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting (RSNA 2013). The version will feature new applications and functionalities that further streamline and accelerate the software. An addition to the software includes General Engine, a new package of automated and standardized applications. “Anatomical Range Presets,” for example, identifies individual regions of the body on images captured using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), aligns the image projections accordingly and then selects detailed views to facilitate case preparation. For customers, this means greater efficiency and enables higher diagnostic confidence.
 
The VA30 version of syngo.via will be more anatomically intelligent to support radiologists and medical technology personnel in their routine workflows. The software “understands” human anatomy and prepares the images for diagnostic reading. It features “automatic rib labeling,” which automatically identifies and labels the ribs in CT scans.
 
The Anatomical Range Presets feature displays a quick, precise, optimal view of selected anatomical regions. The application largely automates the steps of selecting the relevant area, aligning the image projections accordingly and editing the detailed view. The automation delivers a consistent quality in the resulting anatomical views and snapshots and does not depend on the skill of the user.
 
Utilizing a technology akin to facial recognition in digital photography, syngo.via is able to recognize shoulders, spines, hips and other parts of the body in clinical images and optimizes the way in which they are displayed in their anatomical environment. The presets are initially available for specific anatomical regions in CT and MRI images.
 
The syngo.via Advanced Reporting tool, part of the syngo.via General Engine, helps radiologists create clear, well-structured reports for referring or follow-up physicians. Standardized templates enable easier creation of reports but still can be customized to individual needs, and findings from multiple examinations can be consolidated into a single report. The diagnostic report reflects the patient’s entire disease profile, making it easier for doctors to form a comprehensive assessment of the patient’s condition.
 
Siemens will be located at booth 1934 in Hall A of the South Building at RSNA 2013.
 
For more information: www.healthcare.siemens.com

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