News | May 27, 2014

New Sensor Could Light Way Forward in Low-Cost Medical Imaging

May 27, 2014 — New research published in Nature’s Scientific Reports identifies a new type of light sensor that could allow medical and security imaging via low-cost cameras.

The team of researchers from the University of Surrey has developed a new multispectral light sensor that detects the full spectrum of light, from ultraviolet (UV) to visible and near infrared light. Near infrared light can be used to perform noninvasive medical procedures, such as measuring the oxygen level in tissue and detecting tumors. It is also already commonly used in security camera systems and for quality control in the agriculture and food industry.

The researchers believe that having a single low-cost near infrared system, in addition to conventional imaging, opens up new possibilities. "Until now, specialist light sensors have been limited in the kinds of light they can detect, with multiple sensors required to measure different ranges of the light spectrum, significantly increasing cost," said lead researcher Richard Curry, Ph.D., from the University of Surrey's Advanced Technology Institute.

"This new technology could allow surgeons to see inside tissue to find tumors prior to surgery, as well as equip consumer products, such as cameras and mobile phones, with night imaging options,” Curry added. “This is useful for capturing quality pictures in the dark, and may eventually enable parents to simply monitor a child's blood or tissue oxygenation level via a smartphone camera, which could be linked to healthcare professionals.”

The sensors are highly flexible and can be produced cheaply, using the same laser printers found in homes and offices, and unlike other sensors, do not require specialized manufacturing conditions.

For more information: www.surrey.ac.uk

Related Content

Sponsored Content | Videos | Radiology Imaging | June 13, 2019
In an interview with itnTV, Henry Izawa, vice president, modality solutions and clinical affairs, Fujifilm Medical Sy
A static image drawn from a stack of brain MR images may illustrate the results of a study. But a GIF (or MP4 movie), created by the Cinebot plug-in, can scroll through that stack, providing teaching moments for residents and fellows at Georgetown University

A static image drawn from a stack of brain MR images may illustrate the results of a study. But a GIF (or MP4 movie), created by the Cinebot plug-in, can scroll through that stack, providing teaching moments for residents and fellows at Georgetown University. Image courtesy of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

Feature | Information Technology | June 13, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Editor’s note: This article is the third in a content series by Greg Freiherr covering the Society for Imaging In
At ACC 2019, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top CT optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate data needed to do  CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve).

At ACC 2019, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top CT optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate data needed to do
CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve).

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | May 31, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
The fingerprints of value-added medicine were all over products and works-in-progress on the exhibit floor of the ann
Einstein Healthcare Network found that use of automated power injectors reduced CT contrast extravasation rates over a 30-month period.

Einstein Healthcare Network found that use of automated power injectors reduced CT contrast extravasation rates over a 30-month period.

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | May 30, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis
As of 2015, approximately 79 million computed tomography (CT) scans were performed each year in the U.S.
Sponsored Content | Webinar | Computed Tomography (CT) | May 30, 2019
This webinar will explain technical considerations when performing cardiac CT angiography in pediatric patients.
Sponsored Content | Webinar | Computed Tomography (CT) | May 30, 2019
Chest pain is one of the most frequent reasons for an evaluation in the emergency room.There are multiple imaging mod
Brain images that have been pre-reviewed by the Viz.AI artificial intelligence software to identify a stroke. The software automatically sends and alert to the attending physician's smartphone with links to the imaging for a final human assessment to help speed the time to diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the type of stroke, quick action is needed to either activate the neuro-interventional lab or to administer tPA. Photo by Dave Fornell.

Brain images that have been pre-reviewed by the Viz.AI artificial intelligence software to identify a stroke. The software automatically sends and alert to the attending physician's smartphone with links to the imaging for a final human assessment to help speed the time to diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the type of stroke, quick action is needed to either activate the neuro-interventional lab or to administer tPA. Photo by Dave Fornell.

Feature | Artificial Intelligence | May 17, 2019 | Inga Shugalo
With its increasing role in medical imaging,...
Videos | Advanced Visualization | May 16, 2019
This is an example of how virtual reality is being used in neuro-radiology to better evaluate patients using advanced
he DigitalDiagnost C90 is Philips newest premium digital radiography (DR) system, introduced here at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting. It is the industry’s first radiography unit with a live camera image directly displayed at the tube head to provide a clear view of the anatomical area being scanned during the patient positioning process.
360 Photos | 360 View Photos | May 08, 2019
The DigitalDiagnost C90 is Philips newest premium ...